Psychology Lecture Series

Personality Models for the Assessment of Psychopathic Traits & Tendencies in the general population

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Seminars

The Division of Psychology in the School of Social Sciences holds a regular weekly seminar series over the academic year to invite excellent internal and external speakers to present their research findings.

  • From: Wednesday 8 October 2014, 4 pm
  • To: Wednesday 8 October 2014, 5 pm
  • Location: Chaucer 1803 (LT4), Chaucer building, Nottingham Trent University, City Campus, Goldsmith Street, Nottingham, NG1 5LT

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Event details

The Division of Psychology in the School of Social Sciences holds a regular weekly seminar series over the academic year to invite excellent internal and external speakers to present their research findings. This is an integral part of our research culture in the Division which stimulates psychological thinking and debate, and informs about current developments in the various subfields of Psychology. Staff and students from Psychology and the wider University are welcome to attend.

This week's event is from Nadja Heym at Nottingham Trent University and is entitled 'Personality Models for the Assessment of Psychopathic Traits and Tendencies in the general population'.

Abstract

The psychopathy literature is quite convoluted by different conceptualisations and measurements of the multi-dimensional construct. Patrick proposed an overarching Triarchic Psychopathy Model (TPM; Patrick, 2010) model, summarising the three most observable characteristics that are consistently emphasised and empirically studied within the field; namely Boldness (social dominance and lack of fear), Meanness (callousness and lack of empathy) and Disinhibition (impulsivity and erratic lifestyle). While antisocial behaviour is proposed as a main characteristic, recent debate suggests that this may be an outcome rather than a defining criterion for psychopathy. Importantly, psychopathy is conceptualized at the extreme end of a continuum along normal personality functioning, and as such, assessments of psychopathic traits in both abnormal and normal populations are appropriate and indeed necessary to study psychopathy fully (Hare & Neumann, 2008).

In this talk, I will summarise the different conceptualisations and theoretical models of psychopathy and discuss how general personality models can be used to study these issues further. Firstly, Eysenck (1992) positioned psychopathy at the extreme end of his Psychoticism (P) dimension. I present data showing (i) that psychopathy-relevant items of the EPQ-R P scale form psychometrically valid facets that map onto the three-factor model of psychopathy; and (ii) criteria-related validity for P and its facets in associations with self-reported psychopathy and psychopathic tendencies related to Meanness and Disinhibition. In addition, Gray's revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (Gray & McNaughton, 2000) has been proposed to play a role in explaining deficits in both, P and psychopathy. In line with this, I present data showing how the RST constructs may further help to explain underlying mechanisms of psychopathic tendencies related to all three TPM criteria.

Booking information

Should you be external to the University and wish to listen to one of our speakers, please inform the Research Seminars Coordinator Dr Duncan Guest via email prior to the event you wish to attend.

Location details

Room/Building:

Chaucer 1803 (LT4), Chaucer building

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
City Campus
Goldsmith Street
Nottingham
NG1 5LT

Past event

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