Philosophy and Humanities Seminar Series

The Impossible Possibility of Human Capital: Kierkegaard, Foucault and Biopolitics

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Seminars

As part of the School of Arts and Humanities Philosophy and Humanities Research Seminar series Professor William Large, University of Gloucestershire, presents:  The Impossible Possibility of Human Capital: Kierkegaard, Foucault and Biopolitics.

  • From: Wednesday 19 November 2014, 3 pm
  • To: Wednesday 19 November 2014, 5 pm
  • Location: 019, Mary Ann Evans building, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Arts and Humanities Philosophy and Humanities Research Seminar series Professor William Large, University of Gloucestershire, presents: The Impossible Possibility of Human Capital: Kierkegaard, Foucault and Biopolitics.

What is the relevance of Kierkegaard as a political thinker? How might a reading of Kierkegaard constitute a response to our times? Having conquered the external world, destroying the vestiges of political resistance, capitalism is seeking to conquer the internal one, too. This does not mean that we should read Kierkegaard in order to find an authentic subjectivity against capitalism, because this new subjective form of capitalism is all about being authentic and so it can easily be co-opted. On the contrary, I shall argue that whatever the self is in Kierkegaard, it cannot be equated with any simple image of the authentic individual that is resolutely for themselves and against others, but precisely the opposite. To be truly a self is to be open to the other. It is to be other to oneself as oneself. Such a passionate self is exactly the opposite of the image of the self as presented in human capital, whose only relations to others are one of self-interest.

Location details

Room/Building:

019, Mary Ann Evans building

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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