Politics and International Relations Seminar Series

Communicating Climate Change in Russia: state and propaganda

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Seminars

The Division of Politics and International Relations in the School of Social Sciences holds a regular seminar series over the academic year to invite excellent internal and external speakers to present their research findings.

  • From: Wednesday 5 November 2014, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 5 November 2014, 2 pm
  • Location: Chaucer 3704, Chaucer building, Nottingham Trent University, City Campus, Goldsmith Street, Nottingham, NG1 5LT

Past event

Event details

The Division of Politics and International Relations in the School of Social Sciences holds a regular seminar series over the academic year to invite excellent internal and external speakers to present their research findings. This is an integral part of our research culture in the Division which stimulates thought and debate, and informs about current developments in the various subfields of Politics and International Relations.

This seminar will be led by Dr Marianna Poberezhskaya on 'Communicating Climate Change in Russia: state and propaganda.'

Staff and students from the Politics and International Relations division and the wider University are welcome to attend.

Abstract

In 2003 President Vladimir Putin infamously stated at the International Conference on Climate Change in Moscow that 'an increase of two or three degrees wouldn't be so bad for a northern country like Russia. We could spend less on fur coats, and the grain harvest would go up.' Taking into consideration the history of Russian mass media and the state's influence over it, this statement could have potentially meant that one of the most intriguing issues of our time is being dismissed and ridiculed in one of the world's biggest polluters - Russia. However, as will be demonstrated, the problem of communicating climate change in Russia is not that simple. Russia is one of the largest producers of GHG emissions, mainly from extracting and burning fossil fuels. Due to its vast territory, severe weather conditions and the carbon intensive nature of the economy, Russia relies heavily on fossil fuels for domestic consumption. Economic development in Russia was the priority for many decades, relegating environmental issues to the background of political discourse. This has made it very unlikely that Russia will purposefully commit to a reduction of its economic carbon dependency in order to 'save the world' from climate change. Recently, the situation has started to change and climate change is more often perceived as a policy issue of 'opportunities' rather than of 'costs'. The evolution of the perception of climate change risks can be seen through the words of the country's leaders in different decades, from Putin's remarks about less money being spent on fur coats to Dmitry Medvedev’s recognition of climate change's anthropogenic character and its threat to Russia's security.

In the Russian case it is important to study media coverage of climate change because it not only demonstrates what the audience learns about this environmental problem but also how the state deals with it and how Russian mass media balance between the requirements of the free market and the growing influence of the state and economic elites. Overall, this presentation brings together work on Russian mass media, Russian climate change politics and environmental communication.

Booking information

Should you be external to the University and wish to listen to one of our speakers, please inform the Research Seminars Coordinator Dr Kevin Love via email prior to the event you wish to attend.

Location details

Room/Building:

Chaucer 3704, Chaucer building

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
City Campus
Goldsmith Street
Nottingham
NG1 5LT

Past event

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