Learning Metrics, Learning Analytics: using data to improve the student experience

A TILT symposium and ABLE Project Multiplier event (Erasmus+)

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This symposium will create an opportunity for you to explore some of the implications of using data and share examples of how institutions are using learning metrics and analytics to inform their provision.

  • From: Thursday 10 December 2015, 9 am
  • To: Thursday 10 December 2015, 4 pm
  • Location: Newton building, Nottingham Conference Centre, Nottingham Trent University, City Campus, Burton Street, Nottingham, NG1 4BU

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Event details

Data about every stage of the student journey is publicly available to a range of users: students, researchers, managers and policy makers. The sector is starting to use data in a more sophisticated way to bring about change, for example reports by HEFCE and the Equality Challenge Unit about attainment disparities for groups such as widening participation and BME students are starting to instigate institutional change. Making full use of institutional data sets can only help universities make more informed decisions and help improve the student learning experience.

Two interesting developments are arising from the increased use of data.

  • Learning metrics describes the use of metrics to make decisions about the quality of the learning experience, for example student satisfaction and graduate outcomes. Learning metrics are used as a quality management tool, but also, more controversially, to make comparisons about quality across the sector.
  • Learning analytics takes these same data sets and aims to develop an understanding of the likelihood of individuals or groups succeeding. Potentially, learning analytics can alert staff and students to the risks of a student dropping out early, or under-performing.

Challenges for the sectorThe forthcoming Teaching Excellence Framework appears set to place greater emphasis on learning metrics to inform judgements about the quality of an HEI. Its success will depend on the validity and reliability of the metrics used. We know that there are serious problems with data sets currently available and the sector faces significant challenges in addressing these.

The use of learning analytics is set to grow in the UK. If the underlying analytics can successfully identify students at risk, then retention and attainment can be increased. Again this relies on having the right data in the first place, but also whether or not institutions can develop systems to respond to the data available, engage students in the process and ensure that staff possess the time and skill to support students.

What will delegates gain from attending this symposium?The use of data in HE is potentially transformative. However higher education practitioners need to be far more aware of the implications, risks and pitfalls of its use. This symposium will:

  • create an opportunity for colleagues to explore some of the implications of using data
  • share practical examples of how institutions are using learning metrics and learning analytics to inform their provision.

Who should come to this symposium?We feel that these topics are of great interest to a range of colleagues across the sector including:

  • stakeholders interested in improving the student learning experience
  • lecturers
  • University managers
  • policy makers
  • quality management staff
  • staff developers
  • learning developers
  • student planning staff
  • stakeholders who want to find out about recent developments at NTU in learning analytics and metrics.

Achieving Benefits from Learning Analytics (ABLE Project, 2015-2018)The ABLE Project is an Erasmus+ funded research project to investigate and disseminate strategies for using learning analytics to support student transition into higher education. The project is a collaboration between Nottingham Trent University (UK), KU Leuven (Belgium) and Universiteit Leiden (Netherlands).  More information about the project can be found at www.ABLEproject.eu

Programme


Programme

Morning

9 am - 9.50 amRegistration Second floor reception, Nottingham Conference Centre. 
10 am - 10.50 amOpening plenary Jane McNeil, Dr Susannah Lamb, Ed Foster.
11 am - 12 noon

Parallel sessions

  • Option one: Brooks and Moriarty - Data changes everything - The use of learning analytics to support personal tutoring in the Higher Education Institution Liggett - Exploring the Ethical Challenges in learning analytics.
  • Option two: Porter et al. - Using data in the school sector: How Kimberley Primary School uses data to improve the student experience De Laet and Foster - The ABLE project: How do we put what we have learnt from learning analytics into practice?
12 noon - 12.55 pmLunch 

Afternoon   

1 pm - 2 pmKeynote The Perils and Potential of Data, Hetan Shah, Executive Director, Royal Statistical Society. Hetan will talk about the increasing excitement and power of data across a variety of fields. He will also touch on a variety of the concerns that can arise when using data. This will include issues of genuinely establishing causation; ethics and privacy;the accountability of algorithms; skills and data literacy; the problem of chasing targets.
2.10 pm - 3.10 pm

Parallel sessions

  • Option one: McIntosh - Early Invention, Transition and engagement:Using Data to Improve the Student Journey and Learning Experience Currie - Using the NTU Student Dashboard:Nottingham Business School, a case study.
  • Option two: Kerrigan - Using data to inform success across the student life cycle Lawther - Data is not enough: using data as a starting point to improve student outcomes.
  • Option three: Lamb and Jackson - The right quality? Measuring what counts Nelson - Use of data within quality management at De Montfort University - Engaging the academic community with helping to shape reporting as part of a redevelopment project. 
3.20 pm - 3.50 pm Participant demonstrations of different dashboards, informations systems (with cream teas)

The full programme is also available to view.

Presentation slides for the sessions that were held are below:

Opening plenary Jane McNeil, Dr Susannah Lamb, Ed Foster.

Morning Parallel sessions 

Brooks and Moriarty - Data changes everything - The use of learning analytics to support personal tutoring in the Higher Education Institution

Liggett - Exploring the Ethical Challenges in learning analytics.

Porter et al. - Using data in the school sector: How Kimberley Primary School uses data to improve the student experience

Foster - The ABLE project: How do we put what we have learnt from learning analytics into practice?

Afternoon Parallel Sessions 

McIntosh - Early Invention, Transition and engagement:Using Data to Improve the Student Journey and Learning Experience

Currie - Using the NTU Student Dashboard:Nottingham Business School, a case study.

Kerrigan - Using data to inform success across the student life cycle

Lawther - Data is not enough: using data as a starting point to improve student outcomes.

Lamb & Jackson - The right quality? Measuring what counts

Nelson - Use of data within quality management at De Montfort University - Engaging the academic community with helping to shape  reporting as part of a redevelopment project.

Location details

Room/Building:

Newton building, Nottingham Conference Centre

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
City Campus
Burton Street
Nottingham
NG1 4BU

Travel Info:

If you would like more information about getting here please go onto the Nottingham Conference Centre website.

Past event

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