Whither Adversarialism? Realising Victims' Rights in Criminal Trials

An inaugural Lecture by Jonathan Doak

Jonathan Doak
Networking | Public lectures

The European Union's Victims' Directive, introduced in 2012, was significant in that it provided for a binding set of enforceable rights for crime victims throughout their journey through the criminal process.

  • From: Thursday 23 June 2016, 5.45 pm
  • To: Thursday 23 June 2016, 7.30 pm
  • Location: LT4, Chaucer building, Nottingham Trent University, City Campus, Goldsmith Street, Nottingham, NG1 5LT

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Event details

For some years now, governments around the world have been keen to pay lip service to the notion of victims' rights. In practice, however, such rights have tended to fall outside the formal remit of the formal legal system and, as such, are largely unenforceable.

The European Union's Victims' Directive, introduced in 2012, was significant in that it provided for a binding set of enforceable rights for crime victims throughout their journey through the criminal process. Taken together with other international human rights and criminal justice benchmarks, there is now arguably a growing international consensus around what victims might legitimately expect from the criminal justice system in general, and the trial process in particular.

Although there are grounds for optimism that victims are now on the cusp of being able to exercise certain legal rights hitherto denied to them, it is highly questionable whether such rights can be effectively safeguarded within structures and confines of the adversarial model of trial justice.

About Professor Doak

Jonathan Doak is Professor of Criminal Justice at Nottingham Law School, Nottingham Trent University. He completed his LLB and doctoral studies at Queen's University Belfast, and has previously taught at Durham University, the University of Sheffield and the University of Ulster.

Jonathan's main research interests lie in the broad fields of criminal justice and transitional justice. In particular, his research focuses on victims' rights, restorative justice and criminal evidence. He is also interested in human rights, the criminology of the state, the intersection between law and human emotions, and animal welfare law.

Much of Jonathan's recent research has been orientated towards socio-legal and theoretical perspectives. In particular, he has focused on deconstructing the nature of victims' rights against the emergence of international trial norms and the expanding parameters of human rights law. He is particularly interested in analyses of the parallels between victims of state crime / abuse of power and victims of so-called 'ordinary' or 'horizontal' crime.

Currently Jonathan is conducting research into the various ways in which different legal orders have tended to conceptualise issues of reparation and reconciliation. He is also completing a book with David O'Mahony on the 'gap' between restorative justice theory and practice.

Jonathan is Editor of the International Journal of Evidence and Proof and is also a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Criminal Law, the British Journal of Community Justice, the Journal of Forensic Research and Crime Studies and the International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice.

Programme

  • 5.45 pm – Guest arrival and registration
  • 6 pm – Lecture followed by Q&A
  • 7 pm – Drinks reception

Booking information

This is event is free to attend, but booking is required. Please click on the Add to basket button above and complete the short online booking process to reserve your place at this event.

For any queries, or if you experience difficulties with the online booking process, please contact the Nottingham Law School Events Team by email or telephone +44 (0)115 848 4460.

Location details

Room/Building:

LT4, Chaucer building

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
City Campus
Goldsmith Street
Nottingham
NG1 5LT

Past event

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