Politics and International Relations Seminar Series

Conceptual (in)exclusions: Truth, reconciliation and state building in South Africa

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Seminars

The Department of Politics and International Relations in the School of Social Sciences holds a regular seminar series over the academic year to invite excellent internal and external speakers to present their research findings.

  • From: Wednesday 23 November 2016, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 23 November 2016, 2 pm
  • Location: Chaucer Room 2702, Chaucer building, Nottingham Trent University, City Campus, Goldsmith Street, Nottingham, NG1 5LT

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Event details

The department of Politics and International Relations, in the School of Social Sciences, holds a regular seminar series over the academic year to invite excellent internal and external speakers to present their research findings.

This is an integral part of our research culture in the department, which stimulates thought and debate, and informs about current developments in the various subfields of Politics and International Relations.

Staff and students from the department of Politics and International Relations and the wider university are welcome to attend.

This week's seminar is from Nottingham Trent University's Jay Oguntuwase who will be presenting on 'Conceptual (in)exclusions: Truth, reconciliation and state building in South Africa.'

Abstract

Intractable conflicts “are the amongst the most dangerous conflicts in the world,” (Bercovitch,2003). They account for “about 45% of all militarized disputes between 1816-1986,” and “half the wars since 1816 occurred between enduring rivals,’’ Bremer(1992), Goertz & Diehl,(1992). Unfortunately South Africa, under apartheid, is listed among these intractable conflicts. However, popular predictions has it that South Africa was inevitably going to end up with a civil war of unprecedented magnitude.

Interestingly, SA is the only intractable conflict on the globe today that has achieved such a remarkable level of societal peace and stability without an external intervention and without resorting to the predicted bloodbath, through negotiation and institution of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

The curiosity created by this great feat necessitated this research that seeks to understand the underlying principles and mechanisms responsible for this smooth navigation from deep-rooted animosity to democracy within the delicate narrative that enshrouds apartheid South Africa.

Through Critical Discourse Analysis, we were able to isolate a number of themes that were at play in the process of the SA nation building. Further analysis reveals that the conceptual thematic emerged in some strange paradoxical relationships in the TRC report, and in trying to understand those conceptual relationships, we stumbled on the fact that, Agamben’s inclusive exclusive philosophy of the Homo Sacer, operating within a supplementary Derridean logic, appears to be the best model by which to understand the dynamics that brought about the amazing turnaround which was at the base of the demise of apartheid and the institution of majority rule in SA.

Hence, what we have done in this paper is to show how these narratives were derived, in light of the Agamben’s theory of inclusive exclusion.

Booking information

Staff and students from the department of Politics and International Relations and the wider university are welcome to attend.

Should you be external to the University and wish to listen to one of our speakers, please inform the Research Seminar Coordinator, Dr Kevin Love via email prior to the event you wish to attend.

Location details

Room/Building:

Chaucer Room 2702, Chaucer building

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
City Campus
Goldsmith Street
Nottingham
NG1 5LT

Past event

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