School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Research Seminar Series

The Use of Darwin's 'Survival of the Fittest' Theory in the Design of Condition Monitoring Systems

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Seminars

As part of the School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Research Seminar Series, Professor Amin Al-Habaibeh presents:

'The Use of Darwin's "Survival of the Fittest" Theory in the Design of Condition Monitoring Systems'.

  • From: Wednesday 14 December 2016, 12.30 pm
  • To: Wednesday 14 December 2016, 2 pm
  • Location: 21, Newton building, Main Entrance, Nottingham Trent University, City Campus, Goldsmith Street, Nottingham, NG1 4BU

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Research Seminar Series, Professor Amin Al-Habaibeh presents:
'The Use of Darwin's "Survival of the Fittest" Theory in the Design of Condition Monitoring Systems'.

Summary 

The concept of "survival of the fittest" is originated from Charles Darwin's book of 1859 On the Origin of Species, in which his evolutionary theory was outlined describing the mechanism of natural selection. The survival of the fittest concept has been implemented in the engineering sector in condition monitoring systems by Professor Amin Al-Habaibeh and his team during the past 20 years, for feature extraction for evolutionary selection of the most suitable sensors and signal / image processing systems for enhanced system’s performance.

The term ‘ASPS’, which stands for Automated Sensor and Signal Processing Selection, has been used in the past to articulate the concept which is related to the selection of the most suitable sensory characteristic features for the design of an improved condition monitoring system. A condition monitoring system of a machine, system or a process, involves the selection of the most suitable sensor and signal / image processing method to extract the information related to the health conditions (or any other monitored characteristics) and the least dependent on noise and other operational conditions. Neural networks have been used to independently evaluate the performance of the theory and the suggested methodology. The theory has been tested in several projects and a wide range of applications, including end milling, turning, drilling, fixturing systems, crowd monitoring and condition-based maintenance of gears.

For any enquiries, please contact the College of Art, Architecture, Design and Humanities Research Office by email or by telephone on 0115 848 2301.

Location details

Room/Building:

21, Newton building, Main Entrance

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
City Campus
Goldsmith Street
Nottingham
NG1 4BU

Past event

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