English Research Seminar Series

You keep the cow's tail: The Dalit Movement and Dalit Poetry in Gujarat

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As part of the School of Arts and Humanities English Research Seminar Series, Gopika Jadeja, National University of Singapore and Kings College London, presents: 'You keep the cow's tail: The Dalit Movement and Dalit Poetry in Gujarat'.

  • From: Wednesday 8 February 2017, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 8 February 2017, 2 pm
  • Location: 161, Erasmus Darwin, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Arts and Humanities English Research Seminar Series, Gopika Jadeja, National University of Singapore and Kings College London, presents: 'You keep the cow's tail: The Dalit Movement and Dalit Poetry in Gujarat'.

Summary

Around the world today governments and regimes are creating what Gyan Pandey calls a ‘monolingual order’, which does not recognise any other idea of nation and sovereignty except the one it ascribes to. This alienates and denies participation in the nation to marginalised communities excluding them from cultural citizenship leading to contestations of identity within the nation. Gopika Jadeja examines this through a study of the literary sphere in the western Indian state of Gujarat. Gopika suggests that interactions in the literary sphere reveal, and become a site for, contestations of identity and of idea of the nation.

Gopika presents dalit literature in Gujarat as a challenge to the creation of monolithic and exclusive Gujarati asmita (identity and pride) suggesting a plurality of identities and what it means to be ‘Gujarati’. Gopika achieves this by tracing the historical trajectory of modern Gujarati literature as a backdrop in literary and social history against which Dalit poetry in Gujarat emerged, while focusing also on the dalit movement in Gujarat.

Besides poetic texts and archival material from the dalit movement, Gopika draws from the slogans (eg. ‘You keep the cow’s tail, give us our land’) and speeches from recent dalit protests in Gujarat. Combining literary analysis and historiography with the study of a socio-political movement, Gopika brings to the fore an alternative literary history that plays a role in the assertion of a plurality of identities challenging the monolingual order of the region and by extension the nation, in particular the nation of ‘Hindutva’.

For any enquiries, please contact the College of Art, Architecture, Design and Humanities Research Office by email, or telephone +44 (0)115 848 2301.

Location details

Room/Building:

161, Erasmus Darwin

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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