Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series

Integrated computational and experimental techniques to analyse the role of extracellular matrix in the mechanical response of healthy and diseased human aorta

Atomic structure of a biological molecule
Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Dr Alkiviadis Tsamis, University of Leicester, presents: Integrated computational and experimental techniques to analyse the role of extracellular matrix in the mechanical response of healthy and diseased human aorta.

  • From: Wednesday 1 November 2017, 1.10 pm
  • To: Wednesday 1 November 2017, 2 pm
  • Location: ERD 282, Erasmus Darwin, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Dr Alkiviadis Tsamis, University of Leicester, presents: Integrated computational and experimental techniques to analyse the role of extracellular matrix in the mechanical response of healthy and diseased human aorta.

Abstract:

Aortic disease is a leading cause of mortality in developed countries. Each year more than 600,000 people are affected by aortic disease worldwide, and the worldwide cost of aortic repair is estimated to be more than £15 billion per annum. Two of the most common forms of aortic disease are aneurysm and dissection. Several co-morbid conditions including atherosclerosis, hypertension, genetic mutations (e.g., Marfan Syndrome) and developmental defects (e.g., Bicuspid Aortic Valve) are known to lead to one or more forms of aortic disease. However, extensive clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the aortic disease is accompanied by changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the aortic tissue, these ECM changes being considered as important risk factors for aortic disease. Variable aortic wall region-dependent compositional and / or micro-structural changes of the ECM proteins significantly impact upon the elastic properties of aorta, leading to mechanical and hence functional degradation associated with different types and degrees of aortic remodelling during the disease process. ECM is already used as a template for tissue engineering scaffolds, aiming at recapitulating the aortic tissue mechanical response and functionality. New approaches are needed to enable us to investigate the important and influential role of ECM protein “actual” 3D composition and micro-structure on the mechanical properties of aortic tissue in health and disease. I propose a revolutionary approach in numerically deconstructing the human aortic tissue, and physically reconstructing it as a biomimetic 3-D micro-fibrillar protein scaffold, through the use of rapid and robust combined imaging-analysis, soft-lithography and micro-contact printing technology, dramatically improving the tissue engineering community’s ability to analyse the contribution of individual proteins of the ECM micro-environment to the mechanical response of the aortic tissue in healthy and diseased states. The integrated computational and experimental deconstruction / reconstruction technology, once fully researched and developed, will offer a clean, safe, precise and blood-contact-free technique, to accurately micro-fabricate mechanically-testable multi-layered biomimetic aortic tissue constructs. The tissue constructs will incorporate load-bearing ECM protein biomimetic networks, which will play a significant role in the strength, integrity and biomechanical behaviour of the aortic tissue in response to haemodynamic loading conditions. The coupled computational and experimental tools will enable us to determine compositional and / or micro-structural changes, which detrimentally affect the tissue mechanical response and lead it to its functional decline. Those ECM elements could potentially be targeted in the development of new improved approaches for the treatment of aortic disease.

All welcome.

This seminar is hosted by Professor Graham Ball.

For any enquiries please contact Dr Amanda Coutts or Dr John Dickenson.

Location details

Room/Building:

ERD 282, Erasmus Darwin

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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