Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium

Metal-Organic Frameworks: Templates and Supports of Pd Particles

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As part of the School of Science and Technology Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium, Dr Petra Szilágyi, University of Greenwich presents: Metal-Organic Frameworks: Templates and Supports of Pd Particles.

  • From: Wednesday 10 January 2018, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 10 January 2018, 2 pm
  • Location: 193, Erasmus Darwin, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

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Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium, Dr Petra Szilágyi, University of Greenwich presents: Metal-Organic Frameworks: Templates and Supports of Pd Particles.

Abstract

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have high and regular porosity, and topological and chemical tuneability. They are therefore promising materials for supporting nano-objects. [1-4]

The present work is aimed at the assessment of MOFs as templates for the synthesis and support of nanoclusters, i.e. particles < 1 nm, as a function of pore geometry and chemical functionality.

Selected MOFs (MIL-101, NH2-MIL-101, UiO-66, NH2-UiO-66, etc.) were synthesised by solvothermal methods and guest precursors were infused from appropriate solution. Palladium particles (nanoparticles, nanoclusters and single atoms) were obtained by precursor reduction in H2 stream at elevated temperatures.

MOF integrity verified by PXRD and the measurement of the BET surface areas before and after loading. Nanocluster morphology was characterised by HAADF-STEM, their oxidation state was checked XPS and their crystalline phase was established by Pair Distribution Function (PDF) and EXAFS analyses. Density Functional Theory (DFT) was used to model the systems.

No MOF was found to decompose during loading. Nanoclusters were found to form large particles on the surfaces of some pristine MOFs but were embedded in the pores of functionalised MOFs. In the case of functionalised MOFs the surface chemistry of nanoclusters was found to be modified.

The results show that not only the pore structure but also the chemical composition of MOFs’ pores has an impact on the abilities of MOFs to support transition-metal nanoclusters, as also supported by DFT calculations. [5,6] Furthermore, the chemical functionalities of the frameworks influence the surface chemistry and potentially the crystal lattice of the nanoclusters, as revealed by our XPS, PDF and EXAFS results.

Such insight creates understanding in the mechanism and promotes rational design of nanocatalysts for particular applications.

References:
[1] Chem. Soc. Rev. 2013:1807
[2] Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. 2010:3701
[3] CrystEngComm. 2015:199
[4] J. Mater. Chem. 2012:10102
[5] Chem. Commun. 2016:5175
[6] J. Mater. Chem. A, 2017, DOI: 10.1039/C7TA03134C

This seminar is hosted by Dr Matthew Addicoat.

All welcome.

For any queries please contact Dr Sophie Benjamin.

Location details

Room/Building:

193, Erasmus Darwin

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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