Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium

Surface acoustic wave nebulisation: Ultra-fast and pretty sensitive mass spectrometry

Light bulb icon
Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium, Professor Garry Corthals, University of Amsterdam presents: Surface acoustic wave nebulisation: Ultra-fast and pretty sensitive mass spectrometry.

  • From: Wednesday 17 January 2018, 4 pm
  • To: Wednesday 17 January 2018, 5 pm
  • Location: 161, Erasmus Darwin, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium, Professor Garry Corthals, University of Amsterdam presents: Surface acoustic wave nebulisation: Ultra-fast and pretty sensitive mass spectrometry.

Abstract

Surface acoustic wave nebulisation (SAWN) is an ambient ionization method ideally suited for fast and sensitive mass spectrometry (MS). SAWN-MS involves little to no sample preparation. Samples are readily converted to gas-phase molecules following vibrational activation from the surface of a chip made of piezoelectric material. Sample nebulisation involves the release of droplets in the order of nm to µm diameter at ambient conditions. Due to these characteristics, SAWN offers an interesting alternative to existing ‘soft ionisation’ techniques such as ESI and MALDI.

Due to its simple setup and sample preparation, SAWN is of interest in areas where rapid compound and trace identification is a critical, such as art and archaeology, process industry, pharmaceutical, environmental, clinical and forensic laboratories. Moreover, due to its simple setup and size, SAWN analysis could ideally be used with portable MS devices. In the lecture, I will explain the instrumental operation and SAWN-MS configuration, the experimental procedures and review numerous ultra-fast analyses ranging from human samples to bacteria, dyes and original paint materials for art conservation/restoration studies, and forensics applications. I will also show ionisation of several compounds that have hitherto been difficult, if not impossible to be ionised by ESI. Thus, with SAWN a new class of molecules are ‘visible’, due to the mechanism or efficiency of ionisation.

In summary, I hope to show two significant improvements over existing MS-based techniques. Firstly, for the sample we see a reduction in the sample size required and little to no sample preparation compared to existing MS procedures. Secondly, the total analysis time is often reduced from several hours to several minutes, again when compared to the existing MS-methods.

This seminar is hosted by Dr David Kilgour.

All welcome.

For any queries please contact Dr Sophie Benjamin.

Location details

Room/Building:

161, Erasmus Darwin

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

Still need help?

+44 (0)115 941 8418