Performative Masculinity and the ‘Connective’ Memory of Colonialism in Algeria

Modern Languages Research Seminar

Students outside Pavilion
Seminars

In this seminar from the School of Arts and Hmanities, Dr Beatrice Ivey presents a talk on Performative Masculinity and the ‘Connective’ Memory of Colonialism in Algeria

  • From: Wednesday 25 April 2018, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 25 April 2018, 2 pm
  • Location: Mary Ann Evans, Room 008, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham NG11 8NS,

Past event

Event details

Abstract

This paper will explore the interactions of memory and gender in a comparative analysis of literary works by French-Algerian writers Ahmed Kalouaz and Nina Bouraoui. It will develop recent theories of the transnational and transcultural nature of memory, that she refers to as 'connective' memory, to define the ways in which memories are not simply discrete or self-contained but can forge connections with diverse histories and remembering subjects. The main focus of her presentation will be to show how 'connective' cultural memory, as an act of cultural imagination, is gendered. Although memory studies and gender theory have both undergone 'performative turns' in the last three decades, there has been no sustained effort to consider the intersecting performativity of gender and memory. Her paper will draw attention to the implicit naturalisation of masculine perspectives in certain 'connective' narratives of memory by Kalouaz, before exploring how memory, as an affective engagement with the past in Bouraoui’s writing, can be acquired and produced through performative articulations of masculinity.

Biography

Dr Beatrice Ivey is a seminar tutor at the University of Leeds where she was recently awarded her doctorate in Francophone Studies, supervised by Professor Max Silverman and Professor Margaret Atack. Her thesis examined examples of post-1962 cultural production in French (literature, theatre, film) from France and Algeria that contribute to the cultural memory of French colonialism in Algeria and its various transnational legacies. Her recent publications include a chapter entitled ‘Hélène Cixous’s L’Indiade ou l’Inde de leurs rêves: Gendering Memories of Colonialism in India and Algeria’, in French Feminisms 1975 and After: New Readings, New Texts (Peter Lang 2018) and a forthcoming article ‘Gender, Affect, and Postmemory in Nina Bouraoui’s Representations of the Late 1970s’ in the International Journal of Francophone Studies.

Further information

Enda McCaffrey.

Enda.McCaffrey@ntu.ac.uk

Location details

Address:

Mary Ann Evans, Room 008, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham NG11 8NS

Parking:

Parking is available for external visitors on the Clifton Campus. Please arrive via the main entrance where you will be directed by the gate staff.

Past event

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