Biomedical Sciences Research Seminar

Quantitative Proteomics for Mechanistic Study of Biological Rhythms and Circadian Period Altering Drugs

Atomic structure of a biological molecule
Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Sandipan Ray, NTU presents Quantitative Proteomics for Mechanistic Study of Biological Rhythms and Circadian Period Altering Drugs.

  • From: Wednesday 23 May 2018, 1.10 pm
  • To: Wednesday 23 May 2018, 2 pm
  • Location: 282, Erasmus Darwin, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Sandipan Ray, NTU presents Quantitative Proteomics for Mechanistic Study of Biological Rhythms and Circadian Period Altering Drugs.

Abstract

Circadian (~24 hour) clocks exist in almost all types of living organism and play a fundamental role in regulating daily physiological and behavioural processes. We are investigating the regulatory mechanisms of biological clocks and their associations with diverse signaling and metabolic pathways. We apply multiplexed quantitative proteomics approaches to study proteome level oscillations and rhythmic phosphorylation patterns (post-translational modifications) in mice and fruit fly to unravel the underlying mechanisms of post-transcriptional and non-transcriptional oscillators. Drugs or small molecules, which are capable of modulating circadian rhythms, could be useful in developing therapeutic approaches directed towards diverse types of human diseases associated with circadian dysfunctions. We are also performing integrated global and phospho proteome, and thermal proteome profiling (TPP) and kinome profiling to decipher the molecular targets of potential circadian period modulating drugs in human osteosarcoma cells - a robust and well-characterised circadian model system. We anticipate this comprehensive study will contribute towards a better understanding of the mechanism of actions of circadian period altering drugs. This is critical in clearly defining molecular targets in order to modulate daily rhythms for therapeutic benefits.

This seminar is hosted by Professor Graham Ball

All welcome.

For any enquiries please contact Dr Amanda Coutts

Location details

Room/Building:

282, Erasmus Darwin

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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