Biomedical Sciences Research Seminar

Novel insights into immune escape mechanisms of tumours

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Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Prof Barbara Seliger, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg presents: Novel insights into immune escape mechanisms of tumours.

  • From: Wednesday 19 September 2018, 1.10 pm
  • To: Wednesday 19 September 2018, 2 pm
  • Location: 282, Erasmus Darwin, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Prof Barbara Seliger, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg presents: Novel insights into immune escape mechanisms of tumours.

Abstract

Despite the recent advances in cancer immunotherapy strategies, only 20 % to 40 % of tumor patients respond to this treatment and only a few have durable clinical effects. Thus, an increased understanding of the intrinsic and acquired resistance to immunotherapy is mandatory by improving the knowledge of the human immunopathology in particular of the tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment to enhance therapy efficacy and avoid acquired resistances. Indeed, the major hurdle for immunotherapy is immune suppression, either induced by genetic abnormalities or downregulation of the expression of immune modulatory genes in cancer cells or by local adaptive immune suppression due to modulation of the tumor microenvironment. While the first strategy is mediated by multiple mechanisms and triggered by e.g. activation of oncogenes, inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and alterations in the expression of immune modulatory molecules, the second strategy is due to changes in the repertoire of immune cell subpopulations and composition of soluble factors, which differ between various cancer types. Therefore, personalized immune interventions are necessary to enhance immune responses on the basis of genetic and immunological analysis of each patient. In this context, it has recently been demonstrated that in particular the expression of MHC class I APM components, molecules of the interferon signal transduction and PD1/PD-L1 pathway plays an important role in the intrinsic as well as acquired resistance to immunotherapies. Furthermore, an immune suppressive TME is involved in the tumor progression and correlates with a worse prognosis of tumor patients. Thus one major aim and challenge is to revert the immune escape mechanisms, which could occur at the genetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. MicroRNAs are as well as RNA binding proteins have been identified to be involved in the regulation of immune modulatory molecules. Furthermore, the extracellular matrix protein biglycan and redox modulating seleno compounds could revert MHC class I expression. In sum, cancer cell alterations, tumor environmental factors and host-related influences account for the heterogeneic responses and failures during immunotherapy.

This seminar is hosted by Professor Sergio Rutella

All welcome.

For any enquiries please contact Dr John Dickenson

Location details

Room/Building:

282, Erasmus Darwin

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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