Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium

Infrared Spectroscopy of Gas-Phase Metal-Ligand Complexes

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Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium Dr Alexander Gentleman, University of Oxford presents: Infrared Spectroscopy of Gas-Phase Metal-Ligand Complexes.

  • From: Wednesday 14 November 2018, 1.10 pm
  • To: Wednesday 14 November 2018, 2 pm
  • Location: CTLP05, Teaching and Learning Building, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium Dr Alexander Gentleman, University of Oxford presents: Infrared Spectroscopy of Gas-Phase Metal-Ligand Complexes.

Abstract

The use of metal–ligand complexes is widespread in chemistry, both as prototypes for bonding in inorganic and organometallic chemistry and as pivotal species in a wide variety of catalytic processes. The investigation of gas-phase metal ion complexes offers the prospect of gaining a deeper understanding of key metal–ligand interactions, ligand activation, and metal ion solvation, all fundamental processes in chemistry, biology, geochemistry, and astrophysics.1,2 Of particular note, the role of gas-phase metal–ligand complexes as models of reaction intermediates has been studied extensively both experimentally and theoretically.3-5
In our group, we have used a combination of infrared action spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations to probe a variety of isolated, gas-phase metal-ligand complexes. Such work has led to the elucidation of various properties of a multitude of metal-ligand systems, such as: (i) Binding trends and coordination numbers within M+-(N2O)n complexes in terms of O- and N-binding of the N2O ligands to the metal centre,6,7 with potential N-O bond insertion being observed for some systems, (ii) Binding trends of multiple CO2 ligands to M+ and MO2+ centres,8,9 with CO2 binding to the latter potentially resulting in the formation of a “carbonate-like” species, and (iii) The coordination number and potential C-H activation within Au+(CH4)n complexes, with an intriguing observation of enhanced CH4 dehydrogenation being observed upon exciting the T2 mode of CH4 prior to its interaction with Au+.10 The results of the experimental and computational investigations into these systems, in addition to current work on unpublished systems to date, will be discussed in the presentation.

This seminar is hosted by Dr Matthew Addicoat

All welcome.

For any queries please contact Dr Sophie Benjamin

Location details

Room/Building:

CTLP05, Teaching and Learning Building

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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