Engineering and Materials Research Seminar Series

Development of a non-invasive analytical approach for the identification and mapping of unstable corrosion products in ancient bronze objects.

open book on table
Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology's Engineering and Materials Research Seminar Series, Alessandra Vichi NTU presents:Development of a non-invasive analytical approach for the identification and mapping of unstable corrosion products in ancient bronze objects.

  • From: Wednesday 30 January 2019, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 30 January 2019, 2 pm
  • Location: 015, CELS, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology's Engineering and Materials Research Seminar Series, Alessandra Vichi NTU presents:Development of a non-invasive analytical approach for the identification and mapping of unstable corrosion products in ancient bronze objects.

Abstract

Heritage science combines analytical techniques with the study of artworks and materials of artistic and historical relevance. In this context, techniques which enable non-invasive (no need of sampling) analysis of the artworks are essential. This is mainly a consequence of the need of preserving as much as possible the original materials and the impossibility in certain circumstances of taking samples.
Among metal alloys, bronze has been used for millennia to produce many kind of objects, from decorative and religious pieces to sculptures. Although many bronze objects have been well preserved to this day, bronze can be affected by severe degradation involving the formation of copper chloride products, known as “bronze disease”. These chloride products are considered responsible for the rapid decay of bronze, which ultimately cause the loss of unique and historical artworks.
Different analytical approaches can be used to identify the presence of these corrosion products. In this talk, the combination of non-invasive analytical techniques (reflectance spectroscopy covering different spectral ranges) will be presented to determine and differentiate stable and unstable corrosion products on the surface of ancient bronze artworks. The results are further supported by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, X-rays diffraction and SEM-EDX.
Finally, the development and use of a hyperspectral imaging set-up to rapidly identify and map the corrosion products in completely a non-invasive way will be presented.

This seminar is hosted by Dr Ian Shuttlewoth

All Welcome

For any enquires please contact Dr Ian Shuttleworth

Location details

Room/Building:

015, CELS

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

Still need help?

+44 (0)115 941 8418