Biomedical Sciences Research Seminar Series

Investigating the within-patient genomic diversity of Helicobacter pylori populations from different niches of the human stomach

Atomic structure of a biological molecule
Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Daniel Wilkinson, NTU presents: Investigating the within-patient genomic diversity of Helicobacter pylori populations from different niches of the human stomach.

  • From: Wednesday 6 March 2019, 1.10 pm
  • To: Wednesday 6 March 2019, 2 pm
  • Location: 282, Erasmus Darwin, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Daniel Wilkinson, NTU presents: Investigating the within-patient genomic diversity of Helicobacter pylori populations from different niches of the human stomach.

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori is a globally significant human pathogen and is the causative agent of a wide range of diverse gastroduodenal diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulceration and gastric adenocarcinoma. Treatment is typically a triple therapy of two different antibiotics coupled with a proton-pump inhibitor. However, antimicrobial resistance is a growing problem, with H. pylori recently listed as one of the top ten antibiotic resistant pathogens of global concern by the World Health Organisation. This species has been shown to be a globally diverse pathogen expressing large genetic variation, even within geographically clustered sub populations. Furthermore, individuals infected with H. pylori are thought to harbour unique and diverse populations of quasispecies, but diversity between and within different niches of the human stomach and the process of bacterial adaptation to each niche are not yet well understood.

We have applied whole genome deep and single colony sequencing to quantify and characterise the within- and between-niche genetic diversity of H. pylori populations from paired antrum and corpus biopsies from the stomachs of individual patients. In addition, we investigated the between niche (antrum versus corpus) antimicrobial resistance profiles of individual patients. The within and between niche (antrum and corpus) diversity of two sequential datasets were also investigated and we compare results from the same patient before and after failed eradication therapy.

Our results revealed vast diversity in H. pylori populations within individual stomachs. We identified a subset of highly variable genes including outer membrane proteins, restriction modification systems, DNA repair, chemotaxis and virulence associated genes. We show that after failed eradication therapy, there was a big increase in bacterial allelic diversity both within and between niches of the patient’s stomach.

This seminar is hosted by Dr Jody Winter

All welcome.

Location details

Room/Building:

282, Erasmus Darwin

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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