Biomedical Sciences Research Seminar Series

Carnosine in skeletal muscle: biogical action and therapeutic implications.

Atomic structure of a biological molecule
Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Charlie Lavilla, NTU presents: Carnosine in skeletal muscle: biological action and therapeutic implications.

  • From: Wednesday 20 March 2019, 1.10 pm
  • To: Wednesday 20 March 2019, 2 pm
  • Location: ERD 282, Erasmus Darwin, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Charlie Lavilla, NTU presents: Carnosine in skeletal muscle: biological action and therapeutic implications.

Abstract

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) reported that in 2014, 387 million people were estimated to be living with diabetes, an alarming number that is set to rise to 592 million within the next twenty years. A further 316 million with impaired glucose tolerance are at high risk from the disease, with projections indicating that over 1 billion people will be living with or at high risk of diabetes in 2035. Almost 80% of people with diabetes live in low-middle income countries, which means that no country is immune to this disease, and so there is a global struggle to keep pace with the health care demands this creates. More than 90% of these individuals have type 2 diabetes (T2D), a disease characterised by peripheral insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. There are a limited number of options to treat T2D, and oral and injectable medications often become less effective over time. Thus, there is an urgent need to better understand the causes of diabetes, and to identify new targets for the development of novel treatment strategies. The Turner group have published data indicating that high-glucose and high-fat treatment of cellular models generates reactive species, and that this then initiates cell death/inflammation and reduced insulin secretion from pancreatic -cells, and diminished glucose uptake by skeletal muscle cells – the known hallmarks of type 2 diabetes. This talk will focus primarily on the latter, and the potential therapeutic role of carnosine and related analogs to protect cells against glucolipotoxic reactive species (particularly 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-nitrotyrosine) that readily form damaging adducts that impair molecular function of a wide range of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids.

Hosted by Dr Mark Turner.

All welcome.

For any enquiries please contact Dr Amanda Coutts

Location details

Room/Building:

ERD 282, Erasmus Darwin

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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