Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium

Using redox chemistry and entropy for waste heat harvesting via the thermogalvanic effect

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Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium Dr Leigh Aldous, Kings College London presents: Using redox chemistry and entropy for waste heat harvesting via the thermogalvanic effect.

  • From: Wednesday 3 April 2019, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 3 April 2019, 2 pm
  • Location: CTLB P006, Clifton Teaching and Learning Building, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium Dr Leigh Aldous, Kings College London presents: Using redox chemistry and entropy for waste heat harvesting via the thermogalvanic effect.

Abstract

A temperature difference across two electrodes and separated by an electrolyte can be used to generate electricity – with no moving parts – by the thermogalvanic effect. This is driven by entropy differences between reduced and oxidised species. Given that heat is an ubiquitous waste from a wide range of human activities and processes, redox-active electrolytes could be used to harvest some of this energy.
Recently, we have focussed our investigations upon earth-abundant redox couples, typically based upon iron. We have demonstrated how different entropy-driven redox couples can be combined electrically in-series and in-parallel, and the significant effect of gelling electrolytes, in order to develop aqueous thermogalvanic devices for waste thermal energy harvesting. However, concentration is also a critical factor, and electroactive ionic liquids likely represent the highest possible concentration. We have therefore investigated so-called ‘solvate ionic liquids’ composed of lithium cations and highly coordinating glyme solvents, and also the ferrocene|ferrocenium redox couple when dissolved in an ionic liquid. Ultimately, we are moving towards ionic liquids where the anion and/or cation is electroactive; this can have significant impacts upon the nature of the entropy change. As such, this presentation will touch upon both aqueous electrolytes and ionic liquids, and also introduce some targeted applications; for example, thermogalvanic bricks to generate electricity from different interior and exterior temperatures in a building.

All welcome.

Hosted by Dr Matthew Addicoat

Location details

Room/Building:

CTLB P006, Clifton Teaching and Learning Building

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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