Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium

Analytical methods as a tool for prediction and clinical diagnosis of bowel diseases

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Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium Dr Sharon Moore, University of Wolverhampton presents: Analytical methods as a tool for prediction and clinical diagnosis of bowel diseases.

  • From: Wednesday 1 May 2019, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 1 May 2019, 2 pm
  • Location: P006, Clifton Teaching and Learning Building, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium Dr Sharon Moore, University of Wolverhampton presents: Analytical methods as a tool for prediction and clinical diagnosis of bowel diseases.

Abstract

The prediction and diagnosis of clinical diseases requires robust analytical methods of analysis. Historically, analysis has been performed using bioassays requiring antibodies or enzymes that are specific to the analyte of interest. These bioassays suffer from a lack of selectivity but are very sensitive. Advances in technology have seen a rise in the use of mass spectrometry (MS) as a tool in both research and clinical diagnosis of various diseases. MS offers greater selectivity but can still suffer from sensitivity issues for biological samples. The research presented here will show how the analysis of DNA adducts, related to cancer, has progressed towards an MS based approach with liquid-chromatography mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) currently being the gold standard in this field. Furthermore, LC-MS is becoming more common in hospital laboratories for clinical diagnosis. The development of an LC-MS method for measurement of bile acids is currently being investigated with a view to replacing enzymatic assays in clinical diagnosis of bile acid malabsorption (BAM). BAM is also associated with a higher cancer risk and may be linked to high levels of DNA adducts. Hence, this is an area of current research.

Hosted by Dr Quentin Hanley

All welcome

For enquires please contact Dr Matthew Addicoat

Location details

Room/Building:

P006, Clifton Teaching and Learning Building

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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