Physics and Astrophysics Research Seminar Series

Strain engineering, and why it’s better to work under pressure

A diagram of the molecular makeup of OH, O & H - Pt (111)
Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology's Physics and Astrophysics Research Seminar Series, Dr Ian Shuttleworth, Nottingham Trent University presents: Strain engineering, and why it’s better to work under pressure.

  • From: Wednesday 9 October 2019, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 9 October 2019, 2 pm
  • Location: 015, CELS, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology's Physics and Astrophysics Research Seminar Series, Dr Ian Shuttleworth, Nottingham Trent University presents: Strain engineering, and why it’s better to work under pressure.

Abstract

Core-shell nanoparticles have been seen to demonstrate enhanced catalytic activity in a series of reactions including both the steam and dry reformation of methane, the water-gas shift and Boudouard reactions, and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The nanoparticles used in these reactions are composed of an alloy core which is covered with a pure metal shell, and consequently an epitaxial mismatch will exist between the pure metal and the alloy. This mismatch has been created in a wide range of both thin film and core-shell studies and, generally, studies of these systems focus on the consequences of this mismatch.

The rational design of nanoparticle catalysts asks questions about how to prepare the most effective materials for a particular application. Approaching this from a computational point of view is challenging, and is complicated by the core which is often grown in a disordered state, and which requires either notably large unit cells to investigate or strategies to simulate an ‘averaged’ wave-function.

The technique of ‘strain-engineering’ applies a tensile or compressive force and then characterizes the response of the system; this response is then compared with the catalytic character of the system. The presentation will review the field from a computational stand-point, with a focus on metals that promote catalysis, and the progress made to develop an understanding of the behavior of these metals under strain.

This seminar is hosted by Ian Shuttleworth

All Welcome

For any enquires please contact Ian Shuttleworth

Location details

Room/Building:

015, CELS

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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