Physics and Astrophysics Research Seminar Series

Controlling Droplets on Slippery Surfaces

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Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology's Physics and Astrophysics Research Seminar Series, Gary Wells, Northumbria University presents: Controlling Droplets on Slippery Surfaces.

  • From: Wednesday 16 October 2019, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 16 October 2019, 2 pm
  • Location: 015, CELS, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology's Physics and Astrophysics Research Seminar Series, Gary Wells, Northumbria University presents: Controlling Droplets on Slippery Surfaces.

Abstract

Droplets in contact with surfaces are important in many systems. They underpin many natural phenomenon from superhydrophobic plants and animals to capillary bridges in granular media. Controlling and positioning droplets in contact with one or more surfaces has uses in a wide variety of applications such as microfluidics, inkjet printing, and heat exchangers. In this work, we show the control and manipulation of droplet in contact with SLIPS/LIS surfaces.

Slippery Liquid Infused Porous Surfaces (SLIPS) or Liquid Infused Surfaces (LIS) have extremely low contact angle hysteresis. For sessile droplets, this leads to a highly mobile contact line with little to no pinning. We show that droplets confined within a wedge geometry move when the solid boundaries are reconfigured. We show that this translation is energy invariant and that the energy is dissipated via the dynamic frictional forces. We use experiments to manipulate droplets in such geometries and show how it can be used to position and merge droplets.

We also demonstrate the transport and positioning of water droplets on macro-patterned lubricant-impregnated surfaces. The macro patterning produces menisci features in the impregnating liquid layer, which interact with a droplet via a capillary mechanism similar to the Cheerios effect. Here we present experimental results that shows that a droplet confined by a v shaped channel have both a local and a global equilibrium position. We present a mathematical model to quantify the transition between these states.

This seminar is hosted by Fouzia Ouali & Ian Shuttleworth

All Welcome

For any enquires please contact Ian Shuttleworth

Location details

Room/Building:

015, CELS

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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