Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium

Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Skin and Living Skin Equivalent Models

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Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium Professor Malcolm Clench, Sheffield Hallam University presents: Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Skin and Living Skin Equivalent Models.

  • From: Wednesday 20 November 2019, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 20 November 2019, 2 pm
  • Location: CTLP05+06, Clifton Teaching and Learning Building, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Chemistry and Forensic Science Colloquium Professor Malcolm Clench, Sheffield Hallam University presents: Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Skin and Living Skin Equivalent Models.

Abstract

Matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) is a label free imaging technology that has been extensively employed in the pharmaceutical industry. In MALDI-MSI images are created by irradiating the surface of a section of biological tissue, which has been previously coated with an energy absorbing matrix, with a UV laser. Ions ejected from the surface are subjected to mass spectrometric analysis and images generated by plotting the intensity of specific m/z values with positional information as a grey or colour scale. One of the key features of MALDI-MSI that makes its use appealing is the ability to detect and study the distribution of multiple compounds simultaneously in a label-free manner. Additionally by using, accurate mass measurement and tandem MS analysis, molecules can be identified directly on the tissue sections. The initial proof of concept study demonstrated the MALDI imaging of proteins in biological tissue, since then however it has been applied to the analysis of a wide range of pharmaceutical compounds in situations ranging from whole animal sections to drug eluting stents and 3D tissue models.

Here applications of MALDI-MSI to skin and skin models are presented. We have been examining the use of MALDI-MSI to study drug penetration in skin, drug metabolism in skin and wound healing. Data are presented from studies carried out using ex-vivo human skin and a commercial living skin equivalent model (Labskin) including data from of a detailed study into quantitative imaging of Terbinafine along with some preliminary work on the chemical induction of metabolising enzymes.

Hosted by Dr Sophie Benjamin

All welcome

For enquires please contact Dr Sophie Benjamin

Location details

Room/Building:

CTLP05+06, Clifton Teaching and Learning Building

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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