SHAPE Research Seminar Series

Exercise and circulating factors associated with skeletal muscle and bone health in older age & Behavioural approach to successful ageing

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Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology SHAPE Research Centre Seminar Series, Dr. Jessica Piasecki  and Dr. Daniele Magistro, Nottingham Trent University presents: Exercise and circulating factors associated with skeletal muscle and bone health in older age & Behavioural approach to successful ageing.

  • From: Wednesday 20 November 2019, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 20 November 2019, 2 pm
  • Location: ERD 171, Erasmus Darwin, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS

Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology SHAPE Research Centre Seminar Series, Dr. Jessica Piasecki  and Dr. Daniele Magistro, Nottingham Trent University presents: Exercise and circulating factors associated with skeletal muscle and bone health in older age & Behavioural approach to successful ageing.

Abstract for Jessica,

Muscle mass declines 1-2% every year after the age of 50 years. Contractile forces by muscle exert strains on bone and influence the bone mass and strength. Not only is age a cause for muscle and bone decline, circulating factors can play a role, aiding the signalling between muscle and bone.

Exercise has been researched as an intervention to reduce the loss of whole body bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle mass in older age. The type of activity that is the most beneficial for bone health is yet to be identified. Initial studies with master sprint runners (28 males, 10 females, mean age 71±7y), master endurance runners (111 males, 38 females, mean age 70±6y), compared to non-athletic controls (29 males, 30 females, mean age 74±5y) have highlighted that sprinting is the preferred exercise for bone health. Sprinter hip BMD was 10% and 14% greater than that in endurance runners and controls respectively.

The reasons for the difference in bone health between sprint and endurance athletes cannot be explained by muscle strength or activity data. One possibility could be the different concentrations of circulatory factors. Factors dickkopf-1, osteocalcin, osteoprotegrin and sclerostin have been identified to be positively associated with whole body bone mineral density in older adults (n=272), with multivariate regression showing body mass index, circulating sclerostin and whole-body lean mass together accounting for 13.8% of the variation in Whole Body bone mineral density.

To further investigate the circulating factors, statistical modelling has been used to identify those factors were also associated with whole body lean mass. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) and osteoprotegrin (OPG) are significantly negatively (r=-0.170, p=0.007) and positively associated (r=0.140, p=0.030), respectively, with whole body lean mass. With multivariate regression showing height and OPG to account for 45% of the WB Lean mass in older adults. These results highlight OPG to be a key molecule associated with both bone and muscle during ageing. Further investigations in vitro have shown OPG to be capable of enhancing muscular growth and when incubated with TNFa (p<0.0001). Human myoblasts are also able to secrete OPG (p=0.001; Figure 1 and 2), providing a protective mechanisms against TNFa.

The findings conclude that exercise, particularly sprinting, can help reduce the ageing decline in bone health. Circulating factors, particularly OPG, are able to interact with muscle and bone and have an ability to influence the decline during ageing. Mechanisms of this pathway could become a therapeutic target for pharmacological industries in the future, aiming to alleviate the inflammation and muscle loss associated with ageing and muscle mass decline.

Abstract for Daniele

My research focuses on the promotion of active ageing society and healthy lifestyles across the life span. My priority is to understand, prevent, delay and/or to avoid risks related to cognitive, physical, and psychological functioning during ageing. More specifically , I am focusing on analyzing the interplay between cognitive, physical activities and basic Activities of Daily Living (ADL) in older adults. My agenda is to develop new procedures, methodologies and tools that would provide an objective, quantitative and qualitative understanding of these factors in a holistic prospective.

This seminar is hosted by Dr Cleveland Barnett

All welcome

For any enquiries please contact Craig Sale

Location details

Room/Building:

ERD 171, Erasmus Darwin

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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