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Biomedical Sciences Research Seminar Series

More than neuropsychiatry: Emerging implications for trace amine pharmacology in breast cancer, immune modulation and nutrient-induced hormone secretio

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Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Professor Mark Berry, Memorial University of Newfoundland presents: More than neuropsychiatry: Emerging implications for trace amine pharmacology in breast cancer, immune modulation and nutrient-induced hormone secretio.

  • From: Wednesday 4 December 2019, 1.10 pm
  • To: Wednesday 4 December 2019, 2 pm
  • Location: ERD 282, Erasmus Darwin, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS
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Past event

Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Professor Mark Berry, Memorial University of Newfoundland presents: More than neuropsychiatry: Emerging implications for trace amine pharmacology in breast cancer, immune modulation and nutrient-induced hormone secretio.

Abstract

Trace amine-associated receptors (TAAR) are a family of rhodopsin-like, type A, G protein-coupled receptors found only in vertebrate species. The family has undergone pronounced species-dependent expansions and pseudogenization events such that humans express 6 functional variants (TAAR1, TAAR2, TAAR5, TAAR6, TAAR8, and TAAR9), most non-human primates only 3, while common laboratory species have 15 (mice) and 17 (rats) functional isoforms. The evolutionary origin of the family (TAAR1) is the most thoroughly studied with well-documented effects in the brain where it functions to gate dopaminergic activity. Consistent with this, synthetic, highly-selective TAAR1 agonists have been shown to be beneficial in animal models of hyper-dopaminergic states associated with schizophrenia and drug abuse/addiction, while clinical trials have validated TAAR1 as a novel, safe, viable target for pharmacotherapy. Other members of the TAAR family have primarily been examined with respect to their role as a novel family of receptors for olfaction. TAAR are, however, expressed in various cell types other than neurones of the central nervous system and olfactory epithelium. This seminar will review some of our recent work examining the pharmacology of trace amine systems in these other cell types. Following an introduction to the TAAR family, our work identifying high-affinity transport processes for endogenous TAAR1 agonists will be described, followed by an overview of our recent studies examining the pharmacology of TAAR1 in non-neuronal cell types including breast cancer cells, leukocytes, neuroimmune cells, and pancreatic beta-cells. The potential for trace amine systems to contribute to the molecular basis of microbiota regulation of host cellular homeostasis will also be highlighted.

Hosted by Dr Mark Turner

All welcome.

For any enquiries please contact Dr Amanda Coutts

Location details

Room/Building:

ERD 282, Erasmus Darwin

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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