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Biomedical Sciences Research Seminar Series

Generation of Cerebral Cortical Organoids using Aligned Hydrophobic Nanofibres

Atomic structure of a biological molecule
Seminars

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Nick Weir, Nottingham Trent University presents: Generation of Cerebral Cortical Organoids using Aligned Hydrophobic Nanofibres.

  • From: Wednesday 12 February 2020, 1.10 pm
  • To: Wednesday 12 February 2020, 2 pm
  • Location: ERD 282, Erasmus Darwin, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS
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Event details

As part of the School of Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences Research Centre Seminar Series, Nick Weir, Nottingham Trent University presents: Generation of Cerebral Cortical Organoids using Aligned Hydrophobic Nanofibres.

Abstract

Relative to two dimensional (2D) culture, three dimensional (3D) cell culture of primary neurons has yielded improved physiological responses from cells. Nanofibre scaffolds produced using electrospinning are frequently used as a 3D biomaterial support for primary neurons in neural tissue engineering whilst hydrophobic surfaces typically induce aggregation of cells. In order to generate a biocompatible scaffold that possessed both of these qualities, poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) was electrospun as aligned PLLA nanofibre scaffolds. Culture of neurons on these structures facilitated self-assembly of 3D cell clusters. This facile method of generating 3D cortical clusters exhibited compartmentalised soma and aligned neurite arbors. These in vitro clusters were viable for 28 days and responsive to pharmacologically relevant agonists, allowing their definition as “organoids”. Proteomic analysis demonstrated that the organoids possess a more developed profile than the control. The clustering of cells and subsequent formation of synapses was hypothesised to be the cause of the extensive neurite arbor and development of the organoid. Whilst they were not confirmed at the protein level, gene expression analysis indicated further developmental processes occurring in the organoids that do not typically occur in vitro. The results suggest that the 3D cell culture method that has been developed can be used to generate a more physiological model of the cerebral cortex than traditional 2D cell culture.

Hosted by Dr Chris Tinsley

All welcome.

For any enquiries please contact Dr Amanda Coutts

Location details

Room/Building:

ERD 282, Erasmus Darwin

Address:

Nottingham Trent University
Clifton Campus
Clifton Lane
Nottingham
NG11 8NS

Past event

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