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Politics and International Relations Research Seminar

Understanding Climate Change Narratives in Central Asia by Dr Marianna Poberezhskaya and Dr Nataliya Danilova

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This paper fills a substantial gap in academic literature and policy-orientated analysis of the climate change narratives in Central Asia, using the case-study of Kazakhstan as an example.

  • From: Wednesday 19 February 2020, 1 pm
  • To: Wednesday 19 February 2020, 2 pm
  • Location: CH2702, Chaucer Building, Nottingham Trent University, Goldsmith Street, Nottingham, NG1 5LS
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This paper fills a substantial gap in academic literature and policy-orientated analysis of the climate change narratives in Central Asia, using the case-study of Kazakhstan as an example. Kazakhstan positions itself as both a regional and global leader in terms of enacting climate change mitigation measures whilst being also the largest recipient of global multilateral climate funds in Central Asia.

Whilst a great deal of research has been conducted on the vulnerability of this country to climate change risks, very little has been done in terms of understanding how this scientific knowledge translates into the media coverage of climate change-related issues.

In this paper, we explore the patterns and drivers of climate change communication through the analysis of:

  1. the framing of climate change risks
  2. the framing of nexus between climate change mitigation efforts and economic development
  3. the framing of climate-related responsibilities attributed to national and international actors. We argue that it is misleading to align the patterns of climate communication in the countries of the Global South with climate change narratives in Kazakhstan.

Although these countries may prioritise economic concerns over climate change risks, the patterns and drivers of climate change communication in Kazakhstan are more powerfully shaped by intertwining policies of ‘resource nationalism’, and also by vulnerabilities arising from the ambiguous relationship with Russia as a successor to the former colonial power, along with power/knowledge inequalities, which currently characterise interactions between Kazakhstan and other international actors.

Dr Marianna Poberezhskaya is an Associate Professor in International Relations in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Nottingham Trent University. Dr Nataliya Danilova is a Lecturer in Politics at the University of Aberdeen.

Location details

Address:

Chaucer Building
Nottingham Trent University
Goldsmith Street
Nottingham
NG1 5LS

Past event

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