DH Lawrence lighting exhibition celebrates 170 years of creativity

An exhibition of light to celebrate Nottingham Trent University's 170 year Art & Design heritage will draw inspiration from one of the city's most famous authors.

An exhibition of light to celebrate Nottingham Trent University's 170 year Art and Design heritage will draw inspiration from one of the city's most famous authors.

Magic Light, which will be launched on Nottingham Light Night tonight, will showcase up to 40 lamps with a DH Lawrence theme that have been made by students from the School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment.

The exhibition is one of a number of activities which celebrate the 170-years since the establishment of the Nottingham Government School of Design, the origin of art and design education in Nottingham and Nottingham Trent University.

Images of students' work will be projected onto the Council House in Old Market Square, inviting members of the public to visit the exhibition.

Visitors will enjoy an illuminated entrance to the historic Arkwright building from Shakespeare Street as individual steps light up when people tread on them.

A historic fireplace within the foyer – which was referenced in Lawrence's novel The Rainbow – will be lit up and visitors will be led across Benefactors Court by the projection of a rainbow onto the courtyard.

Three chandeliers – including two from Nottingham Trent University alumna and eco-artist Sarah Turner – will feature in the entrance to the exhibition.

Poetry and prose written by students from Aldercar Community Language College in Langley Mill, which reflect the life and works of Lawrence, will be on display.

Alan Crisp, head of product design in the School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment, said: "We're really excited by our students' work and think it will make for a fantastic exhibition.

"We're very keen for members of the public to come along and see just how creative our students are and to learn more about the magnificent creative heritage that this city and our University has."

Doors to the Magic Light exhibition open on Nottingham Light Night from 7 pm. The exhibition is open to the public until 6 March from 10 am to 5 pm Monday to Friday, and 11 am to 4 pm on Saturday.

For more details visit Magic Light.

We're very keen for the public to come along and see just how creative our students are
Alan Crisp, head of product design

How riding a bike can create a lampshade

Student Mark Colliass says his sustainable rotational moulding rig - which allows people to create their own lampshades by riding a bicycle – makes a statement about today's throwaway culture.

The 23-year-old's invention - which rotates a lampshade mould when fitted to the front wheel of an ordinary bicycle – enables people to develop an increased personal attachment to the product by involving them in the manufacturing process.

Users pour jesmonite, a bio resin, into the lampshade mould and add a colorant of their choice. The mould is then placed into the rig and when the user starts to cycle the mould rotates.

The centrifugal force which is produced creates a hollow cylinder out of the jesmonite. And after 40 minutes of cycling, the jesmonite sets to create a new lampshade.

"The feeling of taking the lampshade out of the mould is the best experience, when you realise it has worked," said Mark, a product design undergraduate.

"You definitely have this kind of personal attachment to it which you don't get with other objects.

"It also alters the experience of the bike ride, as you connect the bike ride and the product together."

Users can add different layers of colour to the lampshade by repeating the process once the previous mould has set.

"People can tailor it to how they want it to look," added Mark, who is now looking to take the project further as part of his studies.

"It's about trying to tackle the idea of a disposable generation. We've become very materialistic as it's easy to dispose of things and replace them.

"The hope is that by enabling people to make their own lampshades, and by making that process fun and easy to do, they'll grow more attached to it and be less likely to want to throw it away."

How a candle can challenge social norms

A student says her candle design alludes to the hidden sexuality of DH Lawrence.

Hannah Dunford, 22, has created a candle that melts to reveal a hidden inner candle in the shape of various body parts, such as a woman's hand or a breast.

The outer layer is made from paraffin wax, while the inner layer is made from beeswax which has a higher melting point. The two layers melt separately and have their own wicks, so that they do not burn together.

"I started looking at how DH Lawrence challenged society's views about sexuality and social norms," said Hannah, a product design undergraduate.

"That's how I came up with the whole idea of creating a product which reveals something which is hidden.

"As beeswax is expensive, it's intended to be a higher-end product and the inner candle can be used as an ornament.

"I'm now considering whether to do anything more with it, as there are other processes which I would like to try.

"I think it may appeal to people who would like to buy a candle which makes a statement."

DH Lawrence lighting exhibition celebrates 170 years of creativity

Published on 28 February 2014
  • Category: Press; School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment; School of Art & Design

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