31st BPS Cognitive Section Annual Conference

In September 2014, the 31st BPS Cognitive Section Annual Conference (#CogSec2014) was hosted by the Division of Psychology at NTU.

In September 2014, the 31st BPS Cognitive Section Annual Conference (#CogSec2014) was hosted by the Division of Psychology at NTU.

With more than 160 delegates, from as far away as Australia and Japan, the event had a packed schedule across four days that included three keynotes, 60 individual papers, seven symposia (40 papers), 40 posters across two poster sessions, a pre-conference workshop, a wine reception, a conference meal and a Psychological Illusionist (Duncan William).

The proceedings began with a pre-conference Python Programming workshop for beginners delivered by Mark Andrews, before the conference opened the next day in a packed auditorium. After a short address from NTU's new Vice Chancellor, Professor Edward Peck, the opening keynote from Professor Simon Liversedge of Southampton University promptly followed with a fascinating talk about binocular processing when reading (essentially how we co-ordinate our eyes during reading).

The following day saw Emeritus Professor Graham Hitch (University of York) expertly deliver Donald Broadbent's keynote lecture, the topic of which centred around the evolution of the highly-influential Baddeley and Hitch Working Memory Model.

On the final day, the Section Paper Prize Keynote was awarded to Richard Harris, Andy Young and Tim Andrews for a paper titled ‘Morphing between expressions dissociates continuous from categorical representations of facial expression in the human brain.' The talk was delivered by Professors Andy Young and Tim Andrews (University of York), who discussed the importance of faces to humans and the necessity of using a combination of methods (collecting behavioural data and brain imaging) if we are to better understand face processing - or indeed anything in Psychology. This was an important message and was a theme running across all three keynotes and a good way to conclude the conference talks.

There was a great buzz about the event, helped no doubt by the great facilities and the endless supply of tea, coffee and biscuits!

Dr Andrew Dunn and Dr Duncan Guest

Other highlights included a host of symposia, talks and posters, organised and delivered by staff and postgraduate students from NTU about a range of issues in theoretical and applied cognition. Combined with plenty of food and wine, Psychological illusions, great company and interesting discussions, this created a vibrant conference that was deemed a success by all.

Dr Andrew Dunn and Dr Duncan Guest, conference organisers, commented: “There was a great buzz about the event, helped no doubt by the great facilities and the endless supply of tea, coffee and biscuits!”

Whilst Professor Linden Ball, outgoing Chair of Cognitive Section called it “one of the best BPS cognitive conferences over the past few decades.”

We would like to thank everybody who attended and made the conference such a success.

The 2015 conference will be held at the University of Kent. You can find out more by following @BPSCognitive on twitter or liking them on Facebook.

31st BPS Cognitive Section Annual Conference

Published on 29 September 2014
  • Category: Press office; Research; School of Social Sciences

Still need help?

+44 (0)115 941 8418