CBIL Members in Delegation to Society of Legal Scholars Conference

Two members of the Centre for Business and Insolvency Law, Paula Moffatt and Jenny Gant, recently attended the Society of Legal Scholars conference in Nottingham to present papers on topical themes within their respective areas of research.


Two members of the Centre for Business and Insolvency Law, Paula Moffatt and Jenny Gant, recently attended the Society of Legal Scholars conference in Nottingham as part of a large delegation from the Nottingham Law School to present papers on topical themes within their respective areas of research. The conference of the SLS, which is the professional body representing academic lawyers researching and teaching in the United Kingdom, is an annual event and was held this year on the campus of the University of Nottingham at Beeston.

The Centre has gained a reputation worldwide for the promotion of research and teaching in insolvency. Under its aegis, Paula Moffatt, who is also a Reader in Banking Law, is studying for a Professional Doctorate, a degree designed for those involved in academia or practice who wish to conduct a programme of research with the incidental benefit of enhancing their qualifications. Jenny Gant is a Doctoral Researcher on the PhD programme and is conducting research into the cross-over between employment protection and insolvency law. Jenny is also the recipient of a Vice-Chancellor's Bursary at the Law School, an award only open to students who have completed their Master’s studies with distinction.

At the SLS conference, Paula presented a paper on "The Single Resolution Mechanism: A Necessary Fix?", which examined the creation of a Single Resolution Mechanism (SRM) for failing banks supervised under the so-called Single Supervisory Mechanism instituted within the European Union. The SRM, intended to come into force in January 2015, is seen as the final step in the European Union's move towards banking union. Despite its apparent strengths, its strong architecture and the fact it is backed by funding arrangements at European Union level, Paula's paper questioned how effective the SRM was likely to be in practice. Understanding this will be crucial to assessing whether there is likely to be a streamlined process for the efficient management of failing banks and a potential reduction in the costs of bank failure borne by taxpayers.

Jenny's contribution to proceedings at the SLS was a paper arising from her doctoral project entitled "Labour Regulation and Historical Socio-Economic Context: The UK and France". The paper examines the historical, socio-economic, cultural and specific jurisdictional aspects contributing to the evolution of employment protection regulation in the United Kingdom and France. This was carried out in order to understand why the two systems have developed with such different trajectories as an example of the obstacles that may be present throughout the EU to the alignment or coordination of employment protection rules across the member states. Jenny's study envisages that more closely aligning legal systems within the European Union would improve the effectiveness and competitiveness of cross border commercial enterprises.

The Centre has a number of doctoral students currently enrolled on research programmes, including Paula and Jenny. Their research, as illustrated by their papers at the SLS conference, demonstrates the breadth and depth of the Centre's commitment to foster critical thinking in insolvency and business matters, particularly among younger scholars.

CBIL Members in Delegation to Society of Legal Scholars Conference

Published on 9 September 2014
  • Category: Nottingham Law School

Still need help?

+44 (0)115 941 8418