Nottingham Trent University on the road to developing driverless cars

The development of driverless cars and a fully integrated transport system to reduce accidents, congestion, pollution and improve fuel efficiency is the aim of a new project which involves Nottingham Trent University.

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Driverless cars of a feature of a new project involving NTU

The development of driverless cars and a fully integrated transport system to reduce accidents, congestion, pollution and improve fuel efficiency is the aim of a new project which involves Nottingham Trent University.

The £600,000 venture will support the work of Transport Systems Catapult (TSC) on how to move people and goods around the country in the best way possible.

Academics from the University's School of Science and Technology and Nottingham Business School will work with colleagues from project lead Loughborough University, as well as De Montfort and Coventry universities.

The TSC, a technology and innovations centre, aims to make transport smarter through a concept called Intelligent Mobility (IM), a major theme of which is the driverless car and a fully integrated transport system, and is spending £150m over the next five years.

The three-year partnership between the universities is called IMPART – Intelligent Mobility Partnership – Midlands Centre of Excellence – and will build a new collaboration between academics, business and industry to generate new products and services.

Evtim Peytchev, reader in Wireless and Mobile Computing at Nottingham Trent University's School of Science and Technology, said: "An essential part of achieving the goals of this partnership will be the utilisation of an effective and fast communication between the cars and between the cars and the existing and future roadside infrastructure.

"Nottingham Trent University has significant experience in developing new generation algorithms working in such environments which will be used for providing information-rich environments for deploying autonomous vehicles on the road."

Dr Michael Zhang, reader in International Strategy at Nottingham Business School and editor of The Journal of Sustainable Mobility, said: "Nottingham Trent University is able to offer different areas of expertise to support this project, not just on the technology side, but from an economic and business perspective."

Nottingham Trent University is able to offer different areas of expertise to support this project.

Dr Michael Zhang, reader in International Strategy at Nottingham Business School

Pete Thomas, professor of Road and Vehicle Safety at Loughborough University and the academic lead of IMPART, added: "This unique collaboration between four universities will enable us to work with local businesses to capitalise on the advanced capabilities we have in Intelligent Mobility across the region."

The partners will bring together industry, academics and local authorities to discuss research and transport challenges and how these might be overcome.

About 20 PhD students from the four universities conducting research into IM will also spend time at the TSC in Milton Keynes.

The TSC and the universities are providing £600,000 towards IMPART, industry almost £500,000 in kind.

The TSC aims to exploit opportunities in IM estimated to be worth up to £900 billion by 2025 and establish the UK as a world leader in transport systems, creating new technologies that can be exported.

Nottingham Trent University on the road to developing driverless cars

Published on 1 October 2014
  • Category: Business; Research; Nottingham Business School; School of Science and Technology

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