Teachers to learn how magic and games can bring languages to life

Songs and rhymes, playground games and magic are just some of the methods languages teachers will be exploring as new ways to engage primary school pupils in learning languages at a conference to be held at Nottingham Trent University.

The curriculum change provides an opportunity to instil a love of languages in pupils from an early age.

Clodagh Cooney, manager of Network for Languages East Midlands

Songs and rhymes, playground games and magic are just some of the methods languages teachers will be exploring as new ways to engage primary school pupils in learning languages at a conference to be held at Nottingham Trent University.

With foreign languages now a compulsory part of the curriculum for pupils aged 7-14, teachers have been invited to the Primary Languages Conference 2014: Let's Work Together! on Monday 10 November 2014.

Workshops will focus on a range of topics, including helping pupils to use their memory more effectively, exploring useful iPad apps for learning, and using poems, songs, rhymes and action games to engage pupils. There will also be session on magic tricks to use when teaching Spanish.

The keynote speech will be given by Clare Seccombe, languages teacher, consultant and blogger, who will talk about the value of teachers networking and sharing, the value of children working together and exploring active learning techniques.

The conference has been organised by Nottingham Trent University's Network for Languages East Midlands centre and Nottingham City Council.

Clodagh Cooney, manager of Network for Languages East Midlands, said: "The curriculum change provides an opportunity to instil a love of languages in pupils from an early age, which will hopefully continue throughout their education and careers. This conference will help primary teachers access a range of activities and ideas to take back to the classroom and really engage their pupils."

Councillor Sam Webster, Nottingham City Council's executive assistant for schools, said: "We strongly believe that languages are a vital skill for young people in an increasingly international world. Starting to learn at an early age is really important and our schools are embracing the opportunities provided by the new curriculum, which make the subject statutory for children from the age of seven.

“This conference will allow teachers to demonstrate good practice that already exists within city schools, as well as learn from others how to make their lessons even more engaging.

"We are delighted to once again be working in partnership with Nottingham Trent University, which shares our commitment to languages."

Network for Languages East Midlands sits within Nottingham Trent University's School of Arts and Humanities. It is part of Network for Languages, a national alliance of universities committed to excellence in language learning and teaching, and to supporting language teachers and professionals across all sectors. The centre offers professional development, support, training and networking opportunities for language teachers in primary and secondary schools, colleges and other organisations across the region.

For further details please contact Clodagh Cooney via email; or telephone: +44 (0)115 848 4127

We strongly believe that languages are a vital skill for young people in an increasingly international world.

Councillor Sam Webster, Nottingham City Council's executive assistant for schools

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Teachers to learn how magic and games can bring languages to life

Published on 7 November 2014
  • Category: Press office; Nottingham Institute of Education

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