You are what you eat? Researchers to examine effect of diet on emotions

Researchers at Nottingham Trent University are looking for participants to take part in a new study looking at how dietary supplements can affect our emotions.

We anticipate that the omega-3 supplements will alter brain mechanisms associated with impulsivity, depression, aggression and violent behaviour

Dr Alexander Sumich, Nottingham Trent University

Researchers at Nottingham Trent University are looking for participants to take part in a new study looking at how dietary supplements can affect our emotions.

Psychologists in the University's School of Social Sciences want to examine the impact of omega acid dietary supplements upon the way in which the brain responds to emotions such as anger, fear and sadness.

They are looking for participants aged 18-60 – who consider themselves to have aggressive personality traits – to take part in the six month study.

Participants will take either an omega-3 or omega-6 supplement, with the researchers examining the brain's electrical activity as they view images intended to illicit different feelings and emotions.

It is hoped that the findings could help to better understand how diet might be used to reduce depression and aggressive behaviours.

"Studies in people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) suggest that certain nutrients may well play a role in how we regulate emotions and behaviours, while others have been found to improve our attention and ability to think," said Nottingham Trent University researcher Dr Alexander Sumich.

He said: "We anticipate that the omega-3 supplements will alter brain mechanisms associated with impulsivity, depression, aggression and violent behaviour. The findings could help us to shed some real light on how diet could help to tackle maladaptive behaviours."

The study is in collaboration with THMC LTD, producers of Crystal Mind, an omega-3 fatty acid supplement with high eicosapentaenoic acid content.

Anyone wanting to take part in the study should contact Dr Alexander Sumich.

You are what you eat? Researchers to examine effect of diet on emotions

Published on 10 November 2014
  • Category: Press office; Research; School of Social Sciences

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