Mood study may shed light on symptoms of psychosis

Psychologists are investigating whether mood could play a part in someone being more prone to hallucinations.

Psychologists are investigating whether mood could play a part in someone being more prone to hallucinations. Experts at Nottingham Trent University are hoping their study could help to develop a better understanding of the symptoms of psychosis, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The researchers are looking for participants to take part in the study, which will investigate different people's perceptions under sensory deprivation.

Participants will undertake a 'Ganzfeld' experiment, whereby their vision and hearing is restricted for a short period of time, as well as having their brain's electrical activity measured. They will also be required to complete an interview, questionnaires and computerised assessments.

The study is being funded by the BIAL Foundation in Portugal.

"The findings could help us to shed light on why some people seem more susceptible to certain perceptions than others," said Dr John Anderson, a psychologist in the University's School of Social Sciences.

He said: "We want to know whether factors such as emotion may play a part in hallucinations among people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder."

The research team is looking for right-handed participants, aged 18-60, and who consider themselves healthy with normal hearing, vision, and without adult experience of seizures, colour blindness, neurological or psychiatric conditions.

The experiment will last about three hours and participants will receive gift vouchers for their time.

Anyone wishing to take part in the study should contact Dr John Anderson or Dr Alexander Sumich.

  • Notes for editors

    Press enquiries please contact Dave Rogers, Head of Communications, on telephone +44 (0)115 848 8782, or via email.

    The study is being funded by the BIAL Foundation in Portugal (grant 66/12).

Mood study may shed light on symptoms of psychosis

Published on 20 January 2015
  • Category: Press office; Research; School of Social Sciences

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