Nottingham Law School PhD Student wins Prestigious International Prize

Jenny Gant, a Doctoral Researcher on the PhD programme within the Centre for Business and Insolvency Law, has been awarded the Ian Strang Founders Award, a prestigious international insolvency prize.

Jenny Gant, a Doctoral Researcher on the PhD programme within the Centre for Business and Insolvency Law, has been awarded the Ian Strang Founders Award, a prestigious international insolvency prize. The announcement was made on 1 December 2014.

Ian Strang, a noted insolvency practitioner, was also the first President of INSOL International, a global association grouping together academics, judges, practitioners and policy makers in the field of insolvency. Ian was instrumental in creating INSOL International and laying the foundations of the association, which now has nearly 10,000 members. In his memory, INSOL International created an award to provide an educational opportunity for a postgraduate specialising in insolvency and turnaround matters to attend the annual INSOL International Academics Colloquium and INSOL International Conference, which in 2015 will be held in March in San Francisco. The winner of the award will receive an allowance to cover travel and accommodation in order to present the paper at the INSOL International Academics Colloquium and attend both the Colloquium and full conference. The paper will also be published on the INSOL website and will be submitted for publication in the International Insolvency Review, a peer-reviewed journal in the area of international and comparative insolvency law.

Jenny's successful entry, which was reviewed by an international panel of academics and practitioners, is entitled 'Studies in Convergence? Post-Crisis Effects on Corporate Rescue and the Influence of Social Policy: The EU and the USA.' Its content consists of cross-border issues connected tangentially to her doctoral research, although focussing on comparisons between the European Union and the United States following the effects of the financial crisis on their respective legal systems. Her doctoral project is entitled 'Rescue before a Fall: An Anglo-French Analysis of the Balance Between Business Rescue and Employment Protection' and examines the historical, socio-economic, cultural and specific jurisdictional aspects contributing to the evolution of employment protection regulation and its intersection with the goals of corporate rescue in the United Kingdom and France. The research attempts to provide an understanding of why the two systems have developed with such different trajectories to illustrate the obstacles that may be present throughout the European Union to the alignment or coordination of employment protection rules across the member states and how these might be balanced with the aims of the European rescue culture. Jenny's study envisages that more closely aligning legal systems within the European Union would improve the effectiveness and competitiveness of cross border commercial enterprises.

The Centre for Business and Insolvency Law, which has gained a reputation worldwide for the promotion of research and teaching in insolvency, has a number of doctoral students currently enrolled on research programmes, including Jenny. Jenny is also the recipient of a Vice-Chancellor's Bursary at the Law School, an award only open to students who have completed their master's studies with distinction. Her research, together with that of others within the Centre, demonstrates the breadth and depth of the Centre's commitment to foster critical thinking in insolvency and business matters, particularly among younger scholars.

Nottingham Law School PhD Student wins Prestigious International Prize

Published on 9 January 2015
  • Category: Research; Nottingham Law School

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