Nottingham writer scoops award for talking appliance comedy

A comedy which explores how people find it easier to interact with technology than their fellow human beings could be turned into a BBC radio programme after a Nottingham student won an award which supports new creative talent.

A comedy which explores how people find it easier to interact with technology than their fellow human beings could be turned into a BBC radio programme after a Nottingham student won an award which supports new creative talent.

Them Indoors is written by Nottingham Trent University creative writing PhD student, Lynda Clark, and follows a woman called Amy who can hear her household appliances and holds conversations with them.

The script received the BBC award in the WriterSlam UK competition, an initiative by TriForce Creative Network which aims to help TV production companies and broadcasters access new and established writers from diverse backgrounds and support them in their career development.

Lynda will now work with the Head of BBC Radio Comedy on a 15-minute commission for public broadcast.

In the run up to the final, Lynda had the opportunity to receive advice from producer Michael Jacob, (My Family, Goodnight Sweetheart). For the final judging, her script was performed by a cast of eight award-winning actors and directed by TriForce Creative Network's co-founder and actor, Fraser Ayres (The Smoking Room).

Nottingham-born Lynda grew up in Chilwell and now lives in Bobbersmill. She graduated with a first class BA (Hons) English degree from Nottingham Trent University and progressed on to a Masters in Creative Writing, for which she received a distinction.

Now studying for a PhD, Lynda is exploring how audience responses shape the development of narrative and is writing a novella that encourages readers to think about how their responses might affect a writer. She is also researching the similarities in audience response to Victorian serials and videogames.

Lynda said: "I think the humour in Them Indoors is relatable, because most of us have begged an appliance to work, or shouted at it for not working - Amy just takes that to extremes.

"Winning this prize has opened a lot of doors in the industry for me and I'm excited about working on the radio commission with the BBC. I've always loved reading and writing, and would be doing it alongside whatever other job I ended up in, so trying to turn it into a career in and of itself was always the end goal."

Fraser Ayres added: "When we read Lynda's script we were struck by the originality of the idea - and of course it was very funny! All five finalist's received a career development prize and we think that BBC Radio Comedy and Lynda are a great fit, we're very much looking forward to hearing her work on the airwaves."

Georgina Lock, senior lecturer in English and Creative Writing at Nottingham Trent University's School of Arts and Humanities, said: "Lynda is a very talented writer and this is hopefully the start of a successful career for her. Employability is a big part of our courses and it's also important to consider the wider employability aspect of creative writing – for every play, TV programme, film or book produced there is a whole team of people working in the background whose employment has been created or continued because of that production."

Lynda now plans to continue writing across different forms and formats. She added: "Diversifying is the best way to survive as a creative. Obviously, in an ideal world, Them Indoors would get picked up for a radio series and then a TV series and then become a hugely successful cult cinema classic, but we'll see!"

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Nottingham writer scoops award for talking appliance comedy

Published on 2 December 2015
  • Category: Research; School of Arts and Humanities

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