New Generation Thinkers Award for academic researching fiction on the phone

Dr Sarah Jackson from Nottingham Trent University has been selected by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) to become one of only ten New Generation Thinkers 2016.

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Dr Sarah Jackson is one of ten AHRC New Generation Thinkers

Dr Sarah Jackson from Nottingham Trent University has been selected by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) to become one of only ten New Generation Thinkers 2016.

The scheme is a nationwide search for the brightest minds who have the potential to share their cutting-edge academic ideas through radio and television.

Sarah, senior lecturer in English and Creative Writing within the University's School of Arts and Humanities, is an award-winning writer and literary scholar. She is the author of Pelt (2012), which won the Seamus Heaney Prize and was the readers' nomination for the Guardian First Book Award, and of Tactile Poetics: Touch and Contemporary Writing (2015), which examines the intimate links between the page and the skin in order to provide a new perspective on the role of touch and tactility in literature, film and theory. Sarah has received invitations to read her work throughout the UK and abroad, including at the British Library, the Royal Albert Hall, and both Cambridge and New York Universities.

For the New Generation Thinkers project, Sarah will be focusing on the relationship between literature, psychoanalysis, and the telephone. Working in collaboration with the BT Archives, which hold the records of the oldest communications company, she is exploring the uncanny connections between telephony and telepathy.

This year's ten are a superb example of the broad range of subjects and insights that the arts and humanities give to our lives.

Professor Andrew Thompson, Chief Executive, AHRC

Sarah was announced as winner of the scheme at the Hay Festival and will spend one year working with BBC producers to develop her ideas into broadcasts.

Sarah said: "I've always been intrigued by the radio and the idea of transmitting disembodied voices through the ether, so the opportunity to work with BBC producers to share my research on telephony through this medium is incredibly exciting. It's such an honour to be part of the scheme."

Professor Andrew Thompson, chief executive of the AHRC, said: "Over the last decade we've seen a golden age of dramas and documentaries on our screens and airwaves, underpinned by high-quality research communicated by passionate academics.

"The New Generation Thinkers Scheme feeds this huge appetite for experts to share their specialist knowledge that helps illuminate our lives and stimulates our curiosity.

"This year's ten are a superb example of the broad range of subjects and insights that the arts and humanities give to our lives, helping us to understand the past, the present and the future."

  • Notes for editors

    Press enquiries please contact Helen Breese, Media Relations Manager, on telephone +44 (0)115 848 8751, or via email.

    Notes for editors:

    For more information about Sarah Jackson's work, please visit the website.

    Nottingham Trent University
    Nottingham Trent University's five-year strategic plan Creating the University of the Future has five main ambitions: Creating Opportunity, Valuing Ideas, Enriching Society, Connecting Globally, and Empowering People.

    The Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education was awarded to Nottingham Trent University in November 2015.  It is the highest national honour for a UK university and recognises the institution's world-class research. Pioneering projects to improve weapons and explosives detection in luggage, enable safer production of powdered infant formula, and combat food fraud, led to the prestigious award.

    New Generation Thinkers

    New Generation Thinkers was launched in November 2010 at Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival of Ideas. The New Generation Thinkers scheme invites applications from academics at an early stage of their career who are passionate about communicating modern scholarship to a wider audience. Since 2010, 40 academics from across the UK have presented documentaries on Radio 3, taken part in discussion programmes, and made taster films for BBC Arts Online. Listeners can hear contributions from previous New Generation Thinkers on Radio 3's Free Thinking programme and via the Free Thinking website.

    The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funds world-class research in a wide range of subjects: ancient history, modern dance, archaeology, digital content, philosophy, English literature, design, the creative and performing arts, and many more. Each year the AHRC spends approximately £98m to fund research and postgraduate training, often in collaboration with partners. The quality and range of research supported by this investment of public funds provides considerable economic, social and cultural benefits to the UK.

New Generation Thinkers Award for academic researching fiction on the phone

Published on 6 June 2016
  • Category: Research; School of Arts and Humanities

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