Study highlights "unjust" falls in those affected by burglary

Lone parents, people of non-white ethnicity, those living in inner cities and residents of social rented accommodation are losing out in terms of the UK’s drop in burglaries, research has found.

Lone parents, people of non-white ethnicity, those living in inner cities and residents of social rented accommodation are losing out in terms of the UK’s drop in burglaries, research has found.

As burglary rates across England and Wales fell by more than two-thirds overall, these groups experienced an unequal decrease according to the study by criminologists at Nottingham Trent University.

The work, published in the journal Crime Science , is evidence of the UK's unjust "victimisation inequalities", according to the researchers.

At the other end of the scale, those who gained most from the crime drop – and were less likely to find themselves victims of burglary – were people who lived in homes with two adults, those who owned their homes, households who owned one car, and those that had a combined income of £30,000 to £49,999 a year.

People living in Neighbourhood Watch areas also benefited, the study showed.

Our research shows the extent to which the UK’s burglary crime drop has been disproportionate across different population groups.

Dr James Hunter, Nottingham Trent University

The researchers, based in the University's School of Social Sciences, analysed data from the Crime Survey for England and Wales from 1993 to 2009 as part of the study.

The researchers argue that more needs to be done by governments and criminal justice agencies to achieve more equal reductions in crime levels across different social groups.

Lead author Dr James Hunter, of Nottingham Trent University, said: "Our research shows the extent to which the UK's burglary crime drop has been disproportionate across different population groups. Despite a significant fall in burglary rates since 1993, there are clearly increasing victimisation inequalities and unjust falls for these groups."

Andromachi Tseloni, Professor of Quantitative Criminology at Nottingham Trent University, added: "With burglary now more concentrated on fewer socio-economic groups, targeted crime prevention interventions can be put in place to realistically eradicate this type of crime. Local authority housing providers, for example, can take practical steps to burglary-proof social housing, much of which exists in inner cities and to which lone parents have priority access.

"In addition, the government can adopt planning and building regulations to burglary-proof new housing and support upgrades to the old housing stock, in the same way it has with environmentally friendly housing upgrades."

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Study highlights "unjust" falls in those affected by burglary

Published on 3 June 2016
  • Category: Press

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