The Changing Face of Health and Social Care Research Conference

On Monday 18 April the Health and Social Care team, in collaboration with NTU's Schools, Colleges and Community Outreach, hosted an undergraduate research conference and workshop entitled 'The Changing Face of Health and Social Care'.

On Monday 18 April the Health and Social Care team, in collaboration with NTU's Schools, Colleges and Community Outreach, hosted an undergraduate research conference and workshop entitled 'The Changing Face of Health and Social Care'. The event was attended by current undergraduate students studying on the BA (Hons) Health and Social Care course, academic staff, and students studying BTEC Health and Social Care at local partner schools and colleges.

Prior to the event, students in their first year of undergraduate study were tasked with creating a poster on a contemporary health and social care issue. The students chose their own topics to investigate and worked in small groups to carry out their research. From this they produced a poster, a literary review, and a small piece of primary research. The posters focused on a variety of issues including bipolar disorder in children; men and depression; comparing and contrasting postnatal depression in British white and British Pakistani women; students and mental health; men as victims of domestic abuse; workplace bullying; and child protection and fostering. 

The students from local partner schools and colleges were also asked to create academic posters for the conference. These focused on topics such as domestic violence and child abuse, and gave students the opportunity to participate in a research project and develop skills for independent learning.

A selection of the best posters produced by the undergraduate students were chosen to be presented at the conference, along with posters from attending college students. During the event visitors were asked to vote for their favourite posters, with the top three receiving an award. There was also an award for the 'Best Academy Poster', which was won by Nottingham University Samworth Academy. Alongside the poster exhibition, the event included short talks on being an independent learner, careers in health and social care, and postgraduate research. Visitors also had the opportunity to engage in a round-table discussion on issues within health and social care.

The feedback from current undergraduates and college students alike was highly positive. For the BA (Hons) Health and Social Care students, the event gave them the opportunity to engage with visitors from local authority organisations, meet staff from the wider course team, and see the work that fellow students had produced. For the college students, the opportunity to meet current undergraduates and academics was extremely valuable. The event gave them an insight into life as a university student, the opportunities that a degree in Health and Social Care offers, and the careers available in the field.

Importantly, by creating research posters the BTEC students also had the opportunity to fully engage in the event. Vaughan Hamilton, a teacher at Nottingham University Samworth Academy, commented: "I liked the idea of students having to prepare for the visit. Too often students attend activities and are passive bystanders. By preparing some work in advance they were switched on from the beginning and had a contextual understanding of the event. Having printouts on the wall enable students to feel pride in their work, and they were thrilled to see academics take an interest in what they'd produced."

It is hoped that in the future the event will become a firm fixture in the academic calendar. Jane Challinor, Subject Lead and Principal Lecturer in Health and Social Care, said: "My hope is that this becomes part of our normal academic year, with conversations about research theory and practice between all students and staff seen as both a normal part of teaching and learning and also as something to get excited about".

 

The Changing Face of Health and Social Care Research Conference

Published on 1 June 2016
  • Category: School of Social Sciences

Still need help?

+44 (0)115 941 8418