Rosetta mission scientist to speak at Distinguished Lecture Series

A scientist who was part of the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission will be among five speakers at Nottingham Trent University's Distinguished Lecture Series for 2016/17.

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Artists impression of Rosetta and comet 67P

A scientist who was part of the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission will be among five speakers at Nottingham Trent University's Distinguished Lecture Series for 2016/17.

'Landing on a comet', on November 23, will see Professor Monica Grady CBE describe the space probe's 12-year mission to study comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and learn more about these mysterious ice worlds.

Her lecture will cover some of Rosetta's science highlights, including the deployment of the Philae lander, a small roving spacecraft that gathered 70 hours' worth of data before its batteries died.

Last month the historic mission concluded with a controlled impact onto the comet in a bid to collect the probe's final scientific data.

Professor Grady, who worked as a science advisor in the development of a gas analysis instrument used on Philae, is Professor of Planetary and Space Sciences at the Open University.

Other distinguished speakers include the former Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police, Sir Peter Fahy QPM. On 9 November, his lecture 'More of a social worker than a police officer' will reflect on the tension between punishment and rehabilitation and the position of the police in an ever-questioning society.

On 22 February 2017, The Rt Hon Alan Milburn, chair of the Social Mobility Commission, will discuss Britain's social mobility problem, and will address the five keys to unlocking a fairer country.

On 8 March, Professor Margaret Boden OBE FBA, a research professor of cognitive science at the University of Sussex, will ask what the future holds for artificial intelligence (AI), and whether we should be worried about the creep of AI into social situations.

The final lecture on 22 March, led by Dame Helen Ghosh, Director-General of the National Trust, will discuss the challenges facing the organisation in the 21st Century, and how it responds to economic, environmental and societal change.

Professor Edward Peck, Vice-Chancellor of Nottingham Trent University, said: "These Distinguished Lectures provide an opportunity for all of us in the city to engage with leading thinkers in the UK today as they address some of the major challenges facing our society."

All of the lectures take place on the university's city centre site, are open to the public and free to attend. Visit www.ntu.ac.uk/distinguishedlectures for more information and to reserve tickets.

  • Notes for editors

    Press enquiries please contact Dave Rogers, Head of Communications, on telephone +44 (0)115 848 8782, or via email.

    For the Distinguished Lecture Series brochure, visit the website.

    Nottingham Trent University's five-year strategic plan Creating the University of the Future has five main ambitions: Creating Opportunity, Valuing Ideas, Enriching Society, Connecting Globally, and Empowering People

    The Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education was awarded to Nottingham Trent University in November 2015. It is the highest national honour for a UK university and recognises the institution's world-class research. Pioneering projects to improve weapons and explosives detection in luggage, enable safer production of powdered infant formula, and combat food fraud, led to the prestigious award.

Rosetta mission scientist to speak at Distinguished Lecture Series

Published on 24 October 2016
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