Film festival will challenge public perceptions of imprisonment

Film screenings, workshops and a Q&A with directors will feature as part of Captured: Documenting Incarceration, organised by Nottingham Trent University and Nottingham Contemporary.

Filmgoers will be encouraged to consider film representations of imprisonment as part of a two-day festival.

Film screenings, workshops and a Q&A with directors will feature as part of Captured: Documenting Incarceration, organised by Nottingham Trent University and Nottingham Contemporary.

The festival, at Nottingham Contemporary on 4-5 November 2016 will look at the roles of film-making and the media in challenging public perceptions of incarceration, and encourage the public to think about prison conditions and alternatives to custody.

It will include the screening of a number of films – including A Kind of Sisterhood, which highlights the stories of suffering experienced by female political prisoners in the Irish Republican Army (IRA).

The screening, which includes a discussion with the film's director, coincides with the launch of a new book by Azrini Wahidin, Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Nottingham Trent University.

The book, Ex-Combatants, Gender and Peace in Northern Ireland, highlights the role of women in the IRA. It explores individual women's stories, who offer an insight into their brutal treatment in prison; including the gruelling effects of hunger strikes, strip searches and the no-wash protest.

Other screenings will include Sur les Toits and Injustice and Encountering Attica.

The festival has been organised by Professor Wahidin, of the University’s School of Social Sciences; Dr Sophie Fuggle, of the School of Arts and Humanities; and Janna Graham, Projects Curator at Nottingham Contemporary.

Dr Fuggle said: “Through these events, we hope to change perceptions of incarceration and ask the public to consider the role of prisons and prisoner activism.

“We will welcome film-makers from around the world alongside members of the criminal justice system, who will talk about their experiences and share their knowledge of the justice system.”

Professor Wahidin added: “This festival brings thought-provoking films to the city, encouraging people to think about the treatment or prisoners and gain an insight into what goes on behind bars.”

For dates and times of film screenings, visit the Nottingham Contemporary website.

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Film festival will challenge public perceptions of imprisonment

Published on 4 November 2016
  • Category: Press; School of Arts and Humanities; School of Social Sciences

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