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Global Studies and Media BA (Hons)

  • Level(s) of Study: Undergraduate
  • UCAS Code(s): LP93
  • Start Date(s): September 2022
  • Duration: Three years full-time
  • Study Mode(s): Full-time
  • Campus: Clifton Campus
  • Entry Requirements:
    More information

Introduction:

This course offers a unique insight into significant global issues combined with developing an in-depth knowledge of the media industry, and its practical application across multiple platforms.

This degree enables you to shape your study according to your strengths, interests and career ambitions. Combining these two subjects gives your degree an international and industry perspective that will make you stand out in the graduate employment market.

Our course combinations are designed so that what you learn in one subject will complement and enhance what you learn in the other. In your final year you can choose either to split your time evenly between your two subjects, or to specialise in one.

By choosing Global Studies and Media you’ll be equipped with the knowledge to engage with the world and in your professional career as a global citizen, with an enriched understanding of global trends and tensions.

  • This degree offers work placement opportunities.
  • NTU is in the UK’s Top 30 for Communication and Media Studies (including Journalism) in the Complete University Guide 2021 (25th).
  • This course is offered as full-time or part-time. See How to Apply section

What you’ll study

Global Studies

If you’re concerned about pressing global crises (such as food security, environmental change, conflict, inequality) and the everyday experiences of people living in globalised communities then this is the perfect course for you.

Throughout the course you’ll build a flexible personalised programme by selecting options taught by experts from across the Humanities.

In combination with Media, Global Studies provides you with an innovative opportunity to build contemporary world relevance into your degree.

Media

This popular degree combines theoretical approaches to media with opportunities to learn practical media skills. You’ll learn from industry professionals and explore all aspects of media cultures, from social networking sites and lifestyle magazines to anti-globalisation movements and computer gaming.

Core modules

Foundations in Global Studies

This module introduces principle themes and concepts in Global Studies and the various disciplinary perspectives useful for examining global processes, relationships and experiences. While the focus of the module is on 'the global' particular emphasis is placed on the significance of local histories and geographies shaping the contexts through which different understandings and experiences of the global are produced.

Issues in Intercultural Communication

The study of Intercultural Communication is an integral part of Global Studies. The module addresses issues directly associated with the process of communication in intercultural, inter-group, and interpersonal contexts. The general theme of the module is to engage you in a discussion of the inter-relationship between culture, communication and intercultural communication, from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Understanding Media

This module explores representation and identity; media production and regulation; the way media forms are consumed; and what it's like to work in the media. Throughout this module, you'll investigate the place of media within culture and society more generally and be introduced to principle theories, concepts and approaches.

Screen and Sound Media: Culture and Practice

This module introduces you to a range of key academic texts that examine and theorise screen media (film, television, the computer etc.) and sound media (popular music etc.). You'll also produce a group project based on media culture or media practice.

- OR -

Introduction to Media Practice and Production

This module provides a foundation in the skills required for effective media project work. It explores the principal elements of creating media content through understanding narrative, still and moving image and sound, and the practical and theoretical relationship between those elements.

Some optional modules may be studied on the City campus.

Core modules

Researching Global Experience

In this module, you’ll learn a range of practical skills for carrying out research in a global context. The primary goal is to prepare you for your In-Country Study but the module also provides the skills needed for completing a dissertation in Global Studies.

Media, Theory and Society

Develop your knowledge of theoretical approaches to understanding the media and culture. This module will help you to understand some of the key theoretical approaches that are used in the study of media, communication and culture. You'll develop a familiarity of important theoretical approaches used in contemporary media and for the use of cultural analysis.

Humanities in the workplace

This module will give you a taste of live industry experience. You will complete a placement for a minimum of 37 hours, write a report around your experience and follow clear work-based learning objectives.

Global Studies optional modules

In-Country Study

In Country Study (ICS) is an innovative module that encourages you to engage with issues of social and cultural change in your study site, either abroad or in the UK. You’ll learn to reflect critically on the ways in which these issues are both local and global, gain experience in conducting socio-cultural research in a locality, and communicate clearly the results of your research.

Gender and Nation

This module analyses the nexus of gender and nation as it plays a role in an increasingly globalised world. Despite, or maybe because of, globalisation, nationalism is increasing in many parts of the world, and the role of gender in the construction of these nationalisms will be under investigation here

Culture and Discourse in a Global Society

Understand local and global socio-cultural and political events and issues in their relation to individual experiences, group-formation, intercultural communication, as well as broader discourses and narratives on culture, identification and belonging. You will learn how different forms of knowledge, narratives and discourses may contest each other – and how to study these dynamics in contexts ranging from local to global.

Changing Europe: People, Places & Politics

This module explores the persistence of place in contemporary Europe. You’ll learn key concepts and processes relevant to European society and politics, and be able to understand and analyse key debates such as the effects of globalization, left and right populism, responses to economic crisis and multiculturalism.

Media optional modules

The City and Popular Culture

This module will investigate the effect that urbanisation has on popular culture by exploring a selection of case studies such as: urban exploitation, street-corner society, suburban life and the night-time economy. You'll focus on using your analysis skills and develop research skills either individually or by working within a small group.

Analysing Popular Music

Analysing Popular Music has two major concerns: firstly, to develop a social understanding of transatlantic popular music, and secondly, to develop a cultural-historical perspective on its development over the past hundred years and more. This module introduces you to theoretical approaches to the study of popular music, allowing you to engage in independent critical analysis of popular music and popular musical cultures.

Creative Documentary

This module will encourage you to examine the key critical issues of documentary production such as authenticity and ethics. To prepare you for your dissertation in Year Three, you'll create a 5-10 minute documentary as a group (or individually) and be encouraged to creatively and critically engage with the given styles and genres of documentary.

Researching Media, Communication and Culture

This module introduces the key empirical methods and analytical approaches of Media and Cultural Studies. It enables you to produce original research, and to gain greater understanding of the methods you might use in your Media dissertation. It outlines a range of methods, and shows how these can be applied to particular media and cultural case studies.

Intermediate Media Practice and Production

During this module you'll undertake an in-depth media production project for and with a local external not-for profit, charitable or voluntary organisation. This module will focus on developing your skills in media production and you'll reflect on issues surrounding citizenship and media access.

Some optional modules may be studied on the City campus.

Core module

Dissertation

The final year dissertation module enables you to undertake a sustained, single piece of independently researched work on a topic of your choice, under expert supervision.

OR

Humanities Research Project

Explore your interests in a way that draws on both subject areas. Combine the knowledge and skills you have gained in each of your subjects to complete an interdisciplinary piece of research. You can deliver your project either as a written dissertation or through an alternative creative format such as a publication, film, podcast, website, or performance, supported by a shorter essay.

Global Studies optional modules

Global Citizenship

This module explores contemporary debates on citizenship as a central element in arguments about identity, globalisation, social justice, participation and inclusion/exclusion. You’ll engage critically with theories of citizenship and their intersections with gender, ethnicity and multiculturalism.

Development in the 21st Century

This module engages with debates about the causes and consequences of global inequality. We compare different explanations for persistent patterns of poverty, marginalisation and exclusion and evaluate what policy solutions different perspectives offer for resolving what continues to be a pressing global concern.

Global Environmental Challenges

How do ecological issues effect global poverty and inequality? How does access to water  and other resources connect with dynamics of violence? What solutions are there for managing climate change? This module examines forms of global environmental change. With a focus on global challenges, you will explore the links between environmental issues and society to engage with the key environmental questions today's world governments are wrestling with.

Media optional modules

Lifestyle and Consumer Culture

Explore key approaches to understanding lifestyle and the culture of consumption. You'll be introduced to many important theoretical approaches to understand lifestyle and consumer culture and you'll use many case studies such as travel and tourism to evaluate these.

Cultural Policy

Explore a range of debates within the developing field of policy study which relate to the development of media. You'll examine some of the key institutions within which policies relating to film, television, the visual arts, heritage and other creative industries are determined. You'll explore questions such as: what is cultural value and how important are the cultural and creative industries?

The Body and Popular Culture

How is the body represented in popular culture? Examine key ideas such as how we might understand the various meanings surrounding the body across a range of media and cultural forms. By studying a selection of case studies, you'll explore the way that the body is addressed and located within popular culture, for example, from music to sport.

Client-Led Media Practice and Production

During this module you'll be able to focus on the development of skills in media production by completing a media project that will be set to a 'real brief'. This is an opportunity for you to enhance your employability options by participating in live projects with a real purpose. This module will encourage you to make connections between theory and practice.

How you’re taught

How will I learn?

Each year you’ll choose a range of core and optional modules from the lists above. The first year is normally divided equally between the two joint honours subjects but at the end of Year One, you’ll have the opportunity to select between an equally weighted joint honours course and a more specialised pathway, depending on your interests.

Teaching principally takes place through a combination of lectures, where tutors introduce the key ideas, and seminars, where smaller groups discuss those ideas.

Contact hours

If you’re struggling with a topic or require additional support or guidance, you can arrange to see your tutors in small groups or one-to-one, to discuss essay plans or to seek some specific academic guidance.

It is the nature of the subjects offered in the School of Arts and Humanities, however, that much of your time will be spent engaged in independent study. We recognise that this marks a change of culture from school or college, and we have in place a system of study support to help you adapt to this.

International exchange

You’ll also have the option to take part in an international exchange at a partner university. These options will enable you to gain impressive international experience, and broaden your perspective and career ambitions.

You’ll experience other cultures, travel the globe and open your eyes to a world of opportunities. Our exchange partnership with a number of international universities enables you to live and study in another country in your second year. Find out more.

Learn a new language

Alongside your study you also have the opportunity to learn another new language. The University Language Programme (ULP) is available to all students and gives you the option of learning a totally new language or improving the skills you already have. Learning a new language can enhance your communication skills, enrich your experience when travelling abroad and boost your career prospects. Find out more about the University Language Programme.

Contact hours

  • Year 1 lectures/seminars/workshops (25%), independent study (75%)
  • Year 2 lectures/seminars/workshops (22%), independent study (76%) and placements (2%)
  • Year 3 lectures/seminars/workshops (20%), independent study (80%)

Staff Profiles

Roy Smith

Senior Lecturer

Nottingham Business School

Dr Smith joined NTU in 1992. Initially a member of the International Relations subject area he now leads the Global Studies team. He has diverse academic interests having a background…

Ben Taylor

Principal Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Ben Taylor

Simon Cross

Senior Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Simon Cross

Steven Jones

Principal Lecturer

School of Arts & Humanities

Steven Jones

How you’re assessed

  • Year 1 coursework (87%) and written (13%)
  • Year 2 coursework (100%)
  • Year 3 coursework (100%)

Careers and employability

Your career development

Because you’ll develop such a wide range of skills and knowledge, your career options are really broad. In addition to the course content, you’ll develop key transferable skills including written and oral communication, critical analysis and a variety of IT skills. Plus you’ll become more self-motivated, be able to work independently and in teams, and develop excellent time management skills.

Many graduates also choose to undertake further study on one of our Masters-level courses or MPhil and PhD research degrees.

Campus and facilities

Find out more about our facilities at NTU

Entry requirements

112 UCAS Tariff points

  • 112 UCAS tariff points from up to four qualifications (two of which must be A-level equivalent); or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma - DMM.
  • GCSEs - English and Maths grade C / 4.

Other qualifications and experience

We consider equivalent qualifications and combinations, please see UCAS course search for details and use our calculator to help you work out how many UCAS points your qualifications relate to.

We may also consider credits achieved at other universities and your work/life experience through an assessment of prior learning. This may be for year one entry, or beyond the beginning of a course where applicable, for example, into year 2. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available for this route.

Contextual offers

As well as assessing your application and qualifications, we use contextual data and information to make offers for this course. Depending on your circumstances, we may make you an offer up to two grades below the standard entry criteria. Find out how we assess your application.

Personal statements

For advice on how to write a good personal statement please visit our personal statement page.

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions and Enquiries Team or call on +44 (0)115 848 4200.

For this course, you need one of the following:

  • 112 UCAS tariff points from up to four qualifications (two of which must be A-level equivalent); or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma - DMM.
  • GCSEs - English and Maths grade C / 4.

International qualifications

We accept qualifications from all over the world – check yours here:

Undergraduate preparation courses (Foundation)

If you don’t yet meet our entry requirements, we offer Foundation courses through our partner Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC), based on our City Campus:

English language entry requirements

You can meet our language requirements by successfully completing our pre-sessional English course for an agreed length of time, or by submitting the required grade in one of our accepted English language tests, such as IELTS:

Advanced standing (starting your undergraduate degree in year 2 or 3)

You may be able to start your undergraduate course in year 2 or 3 based on what you have studied before.  This decision would be made in accordance with our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy.

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

Fees and funding

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there’s no need to feel anxious and confused about it. We hope that our fees and funding pages will answer all your questions.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service on +44 (0)115 848 2494.

Additional Costs

Your course fees cover the cost of studies, and include loads of great benefits, such as the use of our library, support from our expert Employability team, and free use of the IT equipment across our campuses.

Library books

Most study modules will recommend one or more core text books, which most students choose to purchase. Book costs vary and further information is available in the University’s bookshop. Our libraries provide a good supply of essential text books, journals and materials (many of which you can access online) – meaning you may not need to purchase as many books as you might think! There may also be a supply of second-hand books available for purchase from previous year students.

Field trips

All essential field trip costs will be included in your course fees. There may be the opportunity to take part in optional field trips, which do incur additional costs.

Placements

If you're undertaking a placement year, you'll need to budget for accommodation and any travel costs you may incur whilst on placement. Many of our placement students do earn a salary whilst on placement which can help to cover these living costs.

Print and copy costs

The University allocates an annual printing and copying allowance of £20 depending on the course you are studying. For more details about costs for additional print and copying required over and above the annual allowance please see the Printing, photocopying and scanning information on the Library website.

Tuition fees are payable for each year that you are at the University. The level of tuition fees for the second and subsequent years of your undergraduate course may increase in line with inflation and as specified by the UK government.

Scholarships

We offer scholarships of up to 50% of your tuition fee. You can apply for your scholarship when you have an offer to study at NTU.

Living costs

Get advice on the cost of living as an international student in Nottingham and how to budget:

Paying fees

Find out about advanced payments, instalment plan options and how to make payments securely to the University:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

How to apply

Ready to join us? Then apply as soon as you can.

For the full-time route just click the Apply button at the top of the page and follow our step-by-step guide.

If you're applying for the part-time route please apply online using the NTU Applicant Portal.

Make sure you check the entry requirements above carefully before you do.

Writing your application and personal statement

Be honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember, we can only make a decision based on what you tell us. So include all of your qualifications and grades, including resits or predicted grades.

Your personal statement is a really important part of your application. It’s your chance to convince us why we should offer you a place! You've got 4,000 characters to impress us. Make sure you use them to show how your skills and qualities are relevant to the course(s) you’re applying for. For more hints and tips, take a look at our page on how to write a good personal statement.

Keeping up-to-date

After you've applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU on our Your Application page. Good luck with your application!

Need help with your application?

For admissions related enquiries please contact us:

Tel: +44 (0)115 848 4200

Email or Ask us a question

You can apply for this course through UCAS. If you are not applying to any other UK universities, you can apply directly to us on our NTU applicant portal.

Application advice

Apply early so that you have enough time to prepare – processing times for Student visas can vary, for example.  After you've applied, we'll be sending you important emails throughout the application process – so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Writing your personal statement

Be honest, thorough, and persuasive – we can only make a decision about your application based on what you tell us:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

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