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MSc Psychology in Clinical Practice MSc

  • Level(s) of Study: Postgraduate taught
  • Start Date(s): September 2023
  • Duration: One year full-time
  • Study Mode(s): Full-time
  • Campus: City Campus
  • Entry Requirements:
    More information

Introduction:

The Psychology in Clinical Practice Masters degree will provide you with a critical understanding of the theory and practice of clinical psychology, and the organisational and social context of clinical psychology services. You'll gain the academic skills to undertake novel research in a clinical setting and you'll gain experience of working within a mental health setting through a six-month placement with a local clinical psychologist.

This blend of research and practical learning is reflected in the course team, which consists of clinical practitioners and academics who have considerable experience working with or researching the people who access clinical psychology services across the UK.

This course will provide an ideal launch pad if you are interested in pursuing a further career in clinical psychology.

Please note that this course does not provide training for you to become a Chartered Clinical Psychologist. Further training is required for this role.

Application deadline

The application deadline date for 2022 entry has been set as 12 pm GMT on Friday 4 March 2022.

What you’ll study

Practice Placement

In this module, you'll undertake a six-month practice placement within a clinical team. Starting in the January of the academic year, you’ll have the unique opportunity to observe mental healthcare in practice, through activities such as joining team meetings, case conferences, and potentially shadowing clinical work. You’ll also gain a theoretical and experiential understanding of reflection and its importance in professional practice. It’s also where you’ll complete the following three sub-modules:

  • The Clinical Research Project
    Write up a piece of empirical clinically-based research using data gathered through your practice placement if possible;
  • The Clinical Research Proposal
    Build on your experience in your placement to design a second piece of research for a subsequent student on placement;
  • The Specialist Clinical Practice Essay
    Apply your scholarship of clinical practice and reflective practice to develop your own professional identity with regard to the work conducted by clinical psychologists in your placement context.

The Clinical Research aspect will be conducted under the supervision of an academic staff member, and normally in collaboration with the supervising placement psychologist. Key tasks / learning points will include:

  • designing and planning (including addressing ethical issues) applied research
  • undertaking an independent research project in Clinical Psychology, using an advanced research method, under the guidance of an appropriate supervisor
  • gaining practice in using and interpreting advanced analyses (quantitative and / or qualitative) to a professional standard
  • developing skills associated with the writing and structuring of professional quality research reports
  • demonstrating advanced scholarship and a critical awareness of current research
  • formulating, structuring and communicating a coherent thesis in relation to your chosen research topic.

Clinical Psychology: Professional Practice

This module allows you to develop a comprehensive understanding of the British Psychological Society and Health and Care Professionals Council standards of conduct, performance and ethics. You will consider how these guidelines can be applied and understood in terms of your developing professional practice and research skills.

Clinical Psychology: Theory into Practice

This module amalgamates the removed modules: Applied Clinical Interventions and Assessment and Formulation. It explores the principles and practices underpinning the core aspects of clinical psychology work. You will gain a critical understanding of key issues in psychological assessment, formulation and intervention in clinical practice.

Clinical Psychology: The Self, Services and Society

This module allows you to develop skills in integrating and synthesising theoretical and empirical sources with regard to the interaction between the social identity of people experiencing major distress, the context of the services which they may access, and the wider environment of the society in which both operate.

You will be supported to develop skills in presentation to an audience of your peers, a key skill in the practice of clinical psychology.

Advanced Experimentation and Statistics One

This module examines the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of statistics used in experimental research. The module also covers application of various experimental designs and statistical techniques and computer software, such as SPSS.

Qualitative Research Design and Analysis One

This module aims to provide you with a comprehensive philosophical and methodological grounding in qualitative research. Additionally you will develop the necessary skills to manage and handle qualitative data, alongside a range of data analytic techniques used by qualitative researchers in psychology.

You'll then choose two out of the following five modules:

Mixed Methods

This module considers the ontological, epistemological, practical, and theoretical issues involved in combining qualitative and quantitative research in psychology. It demonstrates some of the most effective ways in which quantitative and qualitative research techniques can be employed together within a single research programme, and it will also introduce some unusual methods which combine quantitative and qualitative elements within a single procedure.

Using Psychometric Scales in Research and Practice Two

This module illustrates how psychometric theory can be applied to the design of high-quality survey research, and provides you with an understanding of the uses of measurement within different areas of psychology, including the application of psychological testing, design issues in survey-based research, methodological issues relating to administration of psychological measures, and the analysis and interpretation of data obtained from survey research.

Testing Psychological Theories Using Structural Equation Module

You'll be introduced to the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of structural equation modelling (SEM). You'll be equipped with the skills, and understanding, to appropriately construct, analyse, and interpret theoretical path analytic, CFA, and SEM models using LISREL software. You'll also be equipped with the skills to use other advanced multivariate techniques, like latent class analysis and multinomial logistic regression.

Advanced Experimentation and Statistics Two

This module introduces additional advanced statistical topics such as logistic regression, Poisson regression, meta-analysis and multilevel modeling. The module builds on practical topics introduced in Advanced Experimentation & Statistics 1 such as dealing with violations of assumptions and the limitations of standard research designs for real world data (e.g., handling unbalanced or missing data in repeated measures analyses).

Qualitative Research Design and Analysis Two

This module will provide you with both the theoretical underpinnings and analytic practice of conversation analysis (CA), membership categorisation (MCA) and discursive psychology (DP).

Practice Placement

In this module, you'll undertake a six-month practice placement within a clinical team. Starting in the January of the academic year, you’ll have the unique opportunity to observe mental healthcare in practice, through activities such as joining team meetings, case conferences, and potentially shadowing clinical work. You’ll also gain a theoretical and experiential understanding of reflection and its importance in professional practice. It’s also where you’ll complete the following three sub-modules:

  • The Clinical Research Project
    Write up a piece of empirical clinically-based research using data gathered through your practice placement if possible;
  • The Clinical Research Proposal
    Build on your experience in your placement to design a second piece of research for a subsequent student on placement;
  • The Specialist Clinical Practice Essay
    Apply your scholarship of clinical practice and reflective practice to develop your own professional identity with regard to the work conducted by clinical psychologists in your placement context.

The Clinical Research aspect will be conducted under the supervision of an academic staff member, and normally in collaboration with the supervising placement psychologist. Key tasks / learning points will include:

  • designing and planning (including addressing ethical issues) applied research
  • undertaking an independent research project in Clinical Psychology, using an advanced research method, under the guidance of an appropriate supervisor
  • gaining practice in using and interpreting advanced analyses (quantitative and / or qualitative) to a professional standard
  • developing skills associated with the writing and structuring of professional quality research reports
  • demonstrating advanced scholarship and a critical awareness of current research
  • formulating, structuring and communicating a coherent thesis in relation to your chosen research topic.

Clinical Psychology: Professional Practice

This module allows you to develop a comprehensive understanding of the British Psychological Society and Health and Care Professionals Council standards of conduct, performance and ethics. You will consider how these guidelines can be applied and understood in terms of your developing professional practice and research skills.

Clinical Psychology: Theory into Practice

This module amalgamates the removed modules: Applied Clinical Interventions and Assessment and Formulation. It explores the principles and practices underpinning the core aspects of clinical psychology work. You will gain a critical understanding of key issues in psychological assessment, formulation and intervention in clinical practice.

Clinical Psychology: The Self, Services and Society

This module allows you to develop skills in integrating and synthesising theoretical and empirical sources with regard to the interaction between the social identity of people experiencing major distress, the context of the services which they may access, and the wider environment of the society in which both operate.

You will be supported to develop skills in presentation to an audience of your peers, a key skill in the practice of clinical psychology.

Advanced Experimentation and Statistics One

This module examines the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of statistics used in experimental research. The module also covers application of various experimental designs and statistical techniques and computer software, such as SPSS.

Qualitative Research Design and Analysis One

This module aims to provide you with a comprehensive philosophical and methodological grounding in qualitative research. Additionally you will develop the necessary skills to manage and handle qualitative data, alongside a range of data analytic techniques used by qualitative researchers in psychology.

You'll then choose two out of the following five modules:

Mixed Methods

This module considers the ontological, epistemological, practical, and theoretical issues involved in combining qualitative and quantitative research in psychology. It demonstrates some of the most effective ways in which quantitative and qualitative research techniques can be employed together within a single research programme, and it will also introduce some unusual methods which combine quantitative and qualitative elements within a single procedure.

Using Psychometric Scales in Research and Practice Two

This module illustrates how psychometric theory can be applied to the design of high-quality survey research, and provides you with an understanding of the uses of measurement within different areas of psychology, including the application of psychological testing, design issues in survey-based research, methodological issues relating to administration of psychological measures, and the analysis and interpretation of data obtained from survey research.

Testing Psychological Theories Using Structural Equation Module

You'll be introduced to the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of structural equation modelling (SEM). You'll be equipped with the skills, and understanding, to appropriately construct, analyse, and interpret theoretical path analytic, CFA, and SEM models using LISREL software. You'll also be equipped with the skills to use other advanced multivariate techniques, like latent class analysis and multinomial logistic regression.

Advanced Experimentation and Statistics Two

This module introduces additional advanced statistical topics such as logistic regression, Poisson regression, meta-analysis and multilevel modeling. The module builds on practical topics introduced in Advanced Experimentation & Statistics 1 such as dealing with violations of assumptions and the limitations of standard research designs for real world data (e.g., handling unbalanced or missing data in repeated measures analyses).

Qualitative Research Design and Analysis Two

This module will provide you with both the theoretical underpinnings and analytic practice of conversation analysis (CA), membership categorisation (MCA) and discursive psychology (DP).

Don’t just take our word for it, hear from our students themselves

Student Profiles

Abby Moralee

The specific nature of the course was extremely attractive. It appeared to be a perfectly shaped springboard onto the next step of being a clinical psychologist.

Mukosa Tengenesha

I think there was great power in taking the time to choose a course that suited my practical learning style and interests really well and challenged the aspects I struggled with in a doable but rigorous way. It’s been hard but enjoyable.

Megan Dixon

I think the important features of the MSc was its uniqueness... Also, the fact that the placement was guaranteed due to the relationship that the Department of Psychology have with local NHS Trusts.

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How you’re taught

Study and support

You'll be assigned a personal tutor who will provide you with pastoral and academic support throughout your studies. You will meet your tutor during an induction event which will be organised before the course begins.

Additionally, you will meet with the teaching staff from across the course team on a weekly basis at the reflective practice group. A weekly reflective session is affiliated with the support often available in clinical practice, and aims to provide you with the opportunity to reflect on your practice and experiences during this initial stage of your journey towards becoming a professional psychologist.

Assessment methods

The assessment methods on the MSc Psychology in Clinical Practice include:

  • practical reports
  • assessed essays
  • examinations
  • oral presentations
  • a reflective practice diary
  • a clinical research project.

An active research environment

Throughout the course you'll benefit from research-informed teaching. Find out more about our psychology research.

World-leading research

Psychology at NTU has an established international research reputation and is one of the top risers in the REF 2014 research rankings. The 2014 Assessment also showed:

  • 60% of our research outputs were considered to be internationally excellent or world leading in REF 2014
  • 100% of our research impact is internationally excellent with 73% described as world-leading
  • Our research impact and output is the highest of any UK psychology department with an equivalent research environment.

Find out more about our 2014 Research Excellence Framework results.

In-sessional English language support

In-sessional English language support classes are available to all international (non-EU) students studying on degree courses at NTU. There is no extra charge for these classes.

Staff Profiles

Mike Rennoldson (D)

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Mike Rennoldson (D)

Mhairi Bowe

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Mark Andrews

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

Mark Andrews

David Wilde

Senior Lecturer

School of Social Sciences

David Wilde

Careers and employability

The course will be of particular interest to psychology graduates seeking to pursue a career in clinical psychology via doctoral training programmes (DClinPsy). Admission onto such programmes is highly competitive, and completion of this course will enable you to demonstrate that you have both the academic grounding and experience of clinical research to be in a favourable position to pursue either training or further work as an assistant psychologist.

Graduates will also be in a favourable position to consider alternative careers in healthcare and health research – either within core health providers such as the NHS or within academic departments locally or internationally.

The course has been designed by academic staff with previous careers in clinical psychology within the NHS and with the training of clinical psychologists, and also with ongoing clinical work in local mental health services. Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust – the largest provider of mental health services in the UK – has been alongside the University in the formative stages of the course development, and has maintained an interest in ensuring the employability potential of graduates from the course.

Careers and job application advice is available to all our postgraduate students and is provided on a one-to-one basis by a subject specialist within the Department, supported by the University-wide careers service. We're very proud of the achievements of our many graduates and look forward to helping you graduate to a successful career.

Please note that this course does not provide training for you to become a Chartered Clinical Psychologist. Further training is required for this role.

Previous graduates have gone on to pursue careers as a:

  • Assistant psychologist
  • Support worker

*Data extracted from the Latest Destination of Leavers from Higher Education survey 2016-17.

Employability team

Our expert Employability team will work closely with you at every stage of your career planning, providing personal support and advice. You can benefit from this service at any time during your studies, and for up to three years after completing your course. Find out more about the service.

Campus and facilities

As a psychology student you will benefit from our dedicated learning environment. We have specialist research laboratories including eye trackers, motion capture labs and an £80,000 EEG system. These facilities support staff research as well as student projects in the exciting areas of human cognition, behavioural neuroscience, human interaction and communication, and human development. Find out more about these specialist facilities.

You will also have easy access to fantastic facilities in the Chaucer and Taylor buildings including:

  • Lecture theatres and teaching classrooms;
  • Open access PCs and secure wireless points;
  • Study areas and social spaces;
  • Chaucer cafe serving drinks and light snacks;
  • Our brand new School of Social Sciences reception, providing you with easy access to our helpful and friendly support staff.

IT resources

Our IT resource rooms and PC clusters are distributed across our City Campus, with PCs providing access to Microsoft Office, email, web browsing, networked file storage and high-speed online printing services, with a free printing allowance for each student.

Resource rooms are available 24 hours a day.

Books and library resources

Our state-of-the-art Boots library will give you access to an extensive and diverse range of books and periodicals that focus on specialist areas within the built environment. The library's OneSearch system provides access to all our electronic resources, journals and books.

Within the library there is a liaison librarian who has specialist subject knowledge and can offer detailed help in finding and using print and electronic resources, and also with areas such as Harvard referencing and research skills.

Entry requirements

  • You will need a BPS-recognised undergraduate degree (minimum 2.1) in Psychology or an equivalent qualification that confers Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the BPS.
  • Applicants whose undergraduate degree is a 2.2 or equivalent will also be considered, but will be required to demonstrate relevant experience and theoretical knowledge and the ability to study at the required academic level.
  • Applicants applying with an ‘equivalent qualification’ need to be able to supply evidence of Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership prior to being considered for interview.
  • You must explain why you want to study this course and what makes you a good candidate for studying the content we have outlined, including providing the best examples of times when you have demonstrated personal attributes such as self-awareness, resilience, and interpersonal communication.
  • You will need to provide a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service check (formerly known as a Criminal Records Bureau disclosure) which includes proof of identity.
  • One academic or one vocational reference is required.
  • Final selection is based on an interview process with members of the course team.

    In addition to the entry requirements listed above, you must:

  • take part in a group exercise as part of the interview process
  • demonstrate your ability to communicate effectively, through spoken English.
  • NTU may admit a student with advanced standing beyond the beginning of a course, through an assessment of that student's prior learning, whether it is certificated or uncertificated. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available to these prospective students, such as recognising experiential learning or transferring to a similar course at another institution, otherwise known as credit transfer.

    All prospective students who wish to apply via Recognition of Prior Learning should initially contact the central Admissions and Enquiries Team who will be able to support you through the process.

    Deadline for applications - 2022 entry

    The application deadline date for 2022 entry is TBC.

    All applications will be assessed by the course team after applications close. Please be aware that you will not receive a decision on your application until after the deadline date has passed.

    Applicants should upload a copy of their academic or vocational reference by the course application deadline date, alongside their personal statement. Applicants are therefore advised to request their references well in advance of this deadline.

  • You will need a BPS-recognised undergraduate degree (minimum 2.1) in Psychology or an equivalent qualification that confers Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the BPS.
  • Applicants whose undergraduate degree is a 2.2 or equivalent will also be considered, but will be required to demonstrate relevant experience and theoretical knowledge and the ability to study at the required academic level.
  • Applicants applying with an ‘equivalent qualification’ need to be able to supply evidence of Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership prior to being considered for interview; only formal confirmation from the British Psychological Society will suffice and be accepted.
  • You must explain why you want to study this course and what makes you a good candidate for studying the content we have outlined, including providing the best examples of times when you have demonstrated personal attributes such as self-awareness, resilience, and interpersonal communication.
  • You will need to provide a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service check (formerly known as a Criminal Records Bureau disclosure) which includes proof of identity.
  • One academic or one vocational reference is required.

Final selection is based on an interview process with members of the course team.

In addition to the entry requirements listed above, you must:

  • take part in a group exercise as part of the interview process
  • demonstrate your ability to communicate effectively, through spoken English.

Unfortunately, the British Psychological Society will not confirm that international degrees confers GBC status until a student has completed that degree. As such, international students who are currently completing their undergraduate degree and will not be graduating until after the closing date will not be eligible to apply for this entry.

NTU may admit a student with advanced standing beyond the beginning of a course, through an assessment of that student's prior learning, whether it is certificated or uncertificated. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available to these prospective students, such as recognising experiential learning or transferring to a similar course at another institution, otherwise known as credit transfer.

All prospective students who wish to apply via Recognition of Prior Learning should initially contact the central Admissions and Enquiries Team who will be able to support you through the process.

International qualifications

We accept qualifications from all over the world – check yours here:

Postgraduate preparation courses (Pre-Masters)

If you don’t yet meet our entry requirements, we offer Pre-Masters courses through our partner Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC), based on our City Campus:

English language entry requirements

You can meet our language requirements by successfully completing our pre-sessional English course for an agreed length of time, or by submitting the required grade in one of our accepted English language tests, such as IELTS:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

Fees and funding

Study route Home (UK students)
Full-time
£8,800

Fees are for 2022 entry.

Funding your studies

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there's no need to feel anxious and confused about it. We hope that our fees and funding pages will answer all your questions.

There are numerous sources of funding available for postgraduate students, both from external sources such as the Government and funding bodies, and from the University.

There are two main costs involved with postgraduate study: the cost of your tuition fees which is paid directly to the University, and living expenses such as accommodation, travel and food.

You might be able to get a scholarship to help fund your studies, We award scholarships to those students who can demonstrate excellent achievement, passion and dedication to their studies.

Please take a look at our postgraduate fees and funding page for information about sourcing grants, bursaries and scholarships, and much more.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service.

Tel: +44 (0)115 848 2494

Study routeInternational / EU students
Full-time £15,850

Fees are for 2022 entry.

Tuition fees are payable for each year that you are at the University. The level of tuition fees for the second and subsequent years of your postgraduate course may increase in line with inflation and as specified by the UK government.

Scholarships

We offer scholarships of up to 50% of your tuition fee. You can apply for your scholarship when you have an offer to study at NTU.

Living costs

Get advice on the cost of living as an international student in Nottingham and how to budget:

Paying fees

Find out about advanced payments, instalment plan options and how to make payments securely to the University:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

How to apply

All applications to this course can be made through our NTU Applicant Portal.

Make sure you check the entry requirements above carefully before you do.

Writing your application

Be honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember, we can only make a decision based on what you tell us. Make sure you include as much information as possible, including uploading evidence of results already achieved, as well as a personal statement.

Your personal statement should include information on why you want to study this course and what makes you a good candidate for studying the content we have outlined, including providing the best examples of times when you have demonstrated personal attributes such as self-awareness, resilience, and interpersonal communication. The course team will base their assessment solely on the personal statement section of the applicant portal in order to maintain a word/character limit as clear and concise writing is an important skill for our students to demonstrate. They will not base their ratings on any additional material that you may upload to the portal; additional documentation will only be used as a reference and confirm details within the personal statement.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU in our postgraduates’ guide.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) formally known as a Criminal Record Bureau check

Many students choose to collect research data in the UK as part of their projects. You may be required to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service check depending on your project topic.

Keeping up to date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process - so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Open events

The School of Social Sciences holds open events throughout the year. Come along and learn more about our courses, speak to programme leaders and find out about studying with the School.

Getting in touch

If you need more help or support, you can call our Admissions Team on +44 (0)115 848 4200, or contact us at Ask NTU.

Good luck with your application!

Apply online through our NTU applicant portal.

Application advice

Apply early so that you have enough time to prepare – processing times for Student visas can vary, for example.  After you've applied, we'll be sending you important emails throughout the application process – so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Writing your personal statement

Be honest, thorough, and persuasive – we can only make a decision about your application based on what you tell us:

Would you like some advice on your study plans?

Our international teams are highly experienced in answering queries from students all over the world. We also have members of staff based in Vietnam, China, India and Nigeria and work with a worldwide network of education counsellors.

The University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) formally known as a Criminal Record Bureau check

Many students from overseas choose to collect research data in the UK as part of their projects. DBS checks only cover students from the UK, so unless you have been resident in the UK for five years or more, we will need a criminal record check from your home country if you plan to work with vulnerable populations. Checks from overseas can sometimes be referred to by a variety of names such as a Police Check or a Good Behaviour Record. To find out what it is called in your home country and how to apply for one, please visit the government website.

If you are an overseas student and are planning to collect data for your research project from vulnerable populations in your home country, you are advised to apply for a home police check to support your research. You will need to demonstrate in your ethics form that you have met all the requirements of your home country to work with vulnerable populations.

If you are unable to obtain a home Police Check and still wish to work with vulnerable populations in your home country, discuss this with your Course Leader in the first instance. It will need to be made clear in your written correspondence with any participants / organisations that the University has been unable to engage with any disclosure and barring service checks prior to you undertaking your research.

Once you have obtained your police check, a copy of the documentation (in English) should be passed to the relevant course administrator in the School of Social Sciences Office.