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Disabled students

From creating and maintaining environments that enable everyone to flourish, to celebrating Disability History Month, at NTU we’re committed to helping our disabled students to get the most out of university.

We pride ourselves on having a positive, proactive, and informed attitude to accessibility and strive to provide the best possible experience on-campus.

Staff across NTU are given training and guidance in being disability aware, helping to create an inclusive and supportive environment at NTU, while our dedicated Disability Support team offer a huge range of support services and provision for our disabled students.

Disability and inclusion at NTU

Three students working at a bench under a tree outside the Mansfield campus. One student is in a wheelchair. All are smiling in mid-conversation and using their laptops.

The Disability & Inclusion Service has specialised teams to support you, whatever your disability, specific learning difference, mental health or long-term health condition, to support your academic needs and additional support requirements.

The teams offer advice on other types of support available at NTU, and can liaise with other services and outside agencies to coordinate any additional requirements and funding you may need.

Available support includes assistive technology for your studies, specialist mentoring and study skills, BSL interpreters, extended loans in the library and alternative exam arrangements.

Find out more about disability support available at NTU.

We encourage you to tell us about your particular needs when you apply. This information helps us to make the right arrangements for you and to provide the best possible support to make your time at NTU as comfortable, happy and productive as it can be.

A brightly lit room in our Sandby Halls with ample floorspace.

Accessible accommodation

If you have specific accommodation needs because of a disability or medical requirement, we offer a range of accessible accommodation at our City, Clifton and Brackenhurst campuses.

You can find detailed accessibility information for each of our halls on our dedicated Accessibility in Halls page, including guidance on living in halls with a range of access needs and the adjustments we can make.

Communities and events

NTSU’s disabled students’ network

This network is a community of students who meet to share experiences as disabled students, as well as organising events and campaigns to help improve the University experience of students with an impairment – physical or mental, visible or invisible.

Visit the NTSU network page

British Sign Language society

This growing society aims to teach British Sign Language (BSL) and spread awareness of the deaf and sign community in a safe and fun environment.

Visit the NTSU society page

Disability History Month

Every year we host events and opportunities to celebrate the achievements of disabled people and develop disability awareness across NTU and beyond. We share stories from our community and run awareness workshops to help create spaces where people can talk about all forms of disability.

Accessibility in Nottingham

There’s always so much going on in Nottingham. From theatres, museums and galleries to beautiful parks and country houses – many things to do here are accessible for all. In fact, in 2020 Nottingham was named the 20th most wheelchair-friendly city in Europe.

You can find out more about accessibility around Nottingham on the Visit Nottinghamshire website.

Nottingham groups and networks

Below are just some of the groups and networks available outside of the University that residents of Nottingham and Nottinghamshire can access. These groups also campaign to address issues and create awareness around disabled rights and accessibility.

  • Disability Support for Nottingham and County have several social spaces across the city for grabbing a hot drink, doing a spot of gardening, or even hanging out with their resident therapy animals.
  • Autistic Nottingham run a range of online and in-person events and groups, including creative expression sessions and games nights.
  • My Sight Notts provides local social groups for people experiencing sight loss, with activities including singing and art.
  • Nottinghamshire Deaf Society runs several social clubs that meet to play games, have lunch, or just to have a catchup.