Cancer research in Nottingham

This timeline charts the history of cancer research in Nottingham.

1950s

Professor Robert Baldwin moves to Nottingham

1955

Professor Baldwin publishes two seminal papers where he explores the development of immunity to cancer.

1960s

The first major Cancer Research Campaign laboratory is established at Nottingham University, led by Professor Baldwin. They have a staff of 40-50 scientists and focus heavily on immunology.

1973

Professor Robert Rees moves to Nottingham and joins Professor Baldwin’s lab as a research scientist.

1975

Major expansion in clinical research into immunotherapy begins across Nottingham hospitals and medical establishments.

1977

Professor Robert Rees leaves the Nottingham CRC laboratory to become a lecturer at Sheffield Medical School.

1996

Professor Robert Rees returns to Nottingham to become Professor of Biomedical Sciences at Nottingham Trent University.

2006

Professor Robert Baldwin receives an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Science (DSc) from NTU.

2008

The John van Geest Cancer Research Centre is first established after initial funding of £8million from the John and Lucille Geest foundation. This is matched by £2.3 from the Science Research Investment Fund (SRIF). It opens with 18 staff members.

2011

The John van Geest Cancer Research Centre officially opens, housing 35 staff and students.

2012

The John and Lucille van Geest Foundation donates a further £8million to the centre. Professor Robert Baldwin passes away.

2013

The John van Geest Cancer Research Centre Trust is established at Nottingham Trent University. This is set up to assure the financial future of the centre and the trustees include members of NTU’s senior management team. Sue Dewey OBE is appointed as Head of Fundraising and donations from the general public towards our work begin to be accepted.

I spent five happy years working under Professor Robert Baldwin alongside some very talented scientists. He was he first person ever to publish in this area. I came to Nottingham in the 1970s after I had graduated with my doctorate. I became inspired by the whole subject, the working environment and the man himself.

There were times I remember being at conferences and virtually all the great minds in science of the time would know him. He could be standing in the middle of a very large conference and the really eminent scientists both in and outside of this area would recognise him. You then realise how well-known this person is and how much he has contributed to world science.

Professor Bob Rees

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