subject using the TMS lab

The Cognition Group

Group
  • Unit(s) of assessment: Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
  • School: School of Social Sciences

Overview

Researchers in this group undertake theoretical and applied work on human cognition, perception and action. The group comprises approximately 16 core members of faculty (with a number of other affiliated members), 6 RAs and 12 PhD students (for a list of affiliated staff please see the Members section below). Our work includes both traditional laboratory experiments and applied research on a range of topics in cognition (See below). Research by the group draws on dedicated Psychology research facilities and specialist resources such as eye-tracking, an EEG suite, a TMS lab, EMG, a Human Movement Lab, a Driving Simulation lab, and the Computational Modelling and Data Analysis lab (see the Lab section below for more details).

Work by the group has appeared in major international journals such as Cerebral Cortex, Journal of Neurophysiology, Brain Research, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, International Journal of Audiology, Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, Vision Research and Psychological Review. Our work has been funded by a variety of sources including the ESRC, EPSRC, Nuffield Foundation, British Academy, Fundação Bial and the Fire Service Research and Training Trust.

The group has a wide range of expertise across many areas of cognitive psychology. These areas of expertise cluster around the following Key Research Areas

  • Memory

    Overview

    Our research into memory is extensive and covers a large range of topics including models of memory, specific components of memory (autobiographical memory, short term and working memory, prospective memory, spatial memory, metamemory, forgetting, and category and skill learning), memory in specific populations (older adults, autistic children and adults, people with schizotypal personalities) and more applied aspects of memory (face / voice / gait recognition, false memory and eyewitness testimony and memory whilst driving).

    Related staff

    Mark Andrews, Sally Andrews, Stephen Badham, Thom Baguley, Andrew Dunn, Georgina Gous, Calum Hamilton, Christina Howard, Gary Jones, Lucy Justice, Harriet Smith, Katarzyna Zawadzka

    Publications

    Justice, L. V., Morrison, C. M., & Conway, M. A. (under revision). Intentionally fabricated autobiographical memories. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology.

    Zawadzka, K., Higham, P. A. & Hanczakowski, M. (in press). Confidence in forced-choice recognition: What underlies the ratings? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition.

    Zawadzka, K., Hanczakowski, M., & Wilding, E. L. (2017). Late consequences of early selection: When memory monitoring backfires. Journal of Memory and Language, 92, 114-127.

    Andrews, S., Burton, A. M., Schweinberger, S. R., & Wiese, H. (2016). Event-related potentials reveal the development of stable face representations from natural variability. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 1-35.

    Badham, S. P., Hay, M., Foxon, N., Kaur, K., & Maylor, E. A. (2016). When does prior knowledge disproportionately benefit older adults’ memory? Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 23, 338-365.

    Badham, S. P., & Maylor, E. A. (2016). Antimnemonic effects of schemas in young and older adults. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 23, 78-102.

    Flowe, H. D., Smith, H. M. J., Kar, N., Onwuegbusi, T. & Rai, L. (2016). Component and configural processing in simultaneous and sequential lineup procedures. Memory. 24, 306-14. DOI:10.1080/09658211.2015.1004350

    Guest, D., Kent, C., & Adelman, (2016). Relative judgement is relatively difficult: Evidence against the role of relative judgement in absolute identification. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 23,:922-931.

    Zawadzka, K., & Higham, P. A. (2016). Recalibration effects in judgments of learning: A signal detection analysis. Journal of Memory and Language, 90, 161-176.

    Andrews, S., Jenkins, R., Cursiter, H., & Burton, A. M. (2015). Telling faces together: Learning new faces through exposure to multiple instances. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 68(10), 2041-2050.

    Badham, S. P., & Maylor, E. A. (2015). What you know can influence what you are going to know (especially for older adults). Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 22, 141-146.

    Zawadzka, K., & Higham, P. A. (2015). Judgments of learning index relative confidence, not subjective probability. Memory & Cognition, 43, 1168-1179.

    Smith, H. M. J. & Flowe, H. D. (2014). ROC analysis of the verbal overshadowing effect: Testing the effect of verbalisation on memory sensitivity. Applied Cognitive Psychology. DOI:10.1002/acp.3096

    Smith, H.M.J. & Baguley, T. (2014). Unfamiliar voice identification: Effect of post-event information on accuracy and voice ratings. Journal of European Psychology Students. DOI:10.5334/jeps.bs

  • Attention, perception and action

    Overview

    Our work on attention and perception includes theoretical work exploring attentional capture and control, spatial and temporal aspects of attention and the influence of statistical learning and implicit learning on attention. In terms of phenomenon our work ranges from relatively low level visual cognition (e.g., visual masking) to high level tasks (e.g., visual search in the real world). The majority of research focuses on either visual or auditory perception, as well as multisensory integration and perception.

    We also have a strong applied focus, with research on hazard perception in driving, applied eye-tracking research (deception detection, lifeguarding, driving, consumer attention) and person perception. A variety of methodologies underpin this research, including eye tracking, mathematical modelling, TMS driving simulation and real world experiments. Our research is facilitated by a number of eye tracking systems, including mobile eye tracking, driving simulators and a sound-proof booth for auditory research.

    Related staff

    Sally Andrews, Hayley Boulton, David Crundall, Robert Davies, Vivienne Du, Andrew Dunn, Georgina Gous, Duncan Guest, Calum Hamilton, Christina Howard, Lucy Justice, Andrew Mackenzie, Suvo Mitra, Kate Roberts,  Mark Sergeant, Harriet Smith, Paula Stacey, Angie Young.

    Publications

    Mackenzie, A.K. & Harris, J.M. (In press). A link between attentional function, effective eye movements and driving ability. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

    Mitra, S., Doherty, N., Boulton, H., & Maylor, E.A. (in press). Age-related reversal of postural adjustment characteristics during motor imagery. Psychology and Aging.

    Guest D., Gibbert M., Estes Z., Mazursky, D,. & Lam, M. (in press) Modulation of taxonomic (versus thematic) similarity judgments and product choices by inducing local and global processing. Journal of Cognitive Psychology

    Crundall, D. (2016). Hazard prediction discriminates between novice and experienced drivers. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 86, 47-58.

    Howard, C.J., Bashir, N., Chechlacz, M. and Humphreys, G.W., (2016). Neural mechanisms of temporal resolution of attention. Cerebral Cortex, 26 (7), pp. 2952-2969. ISSN 1460-2199

    Smith, H. M. J., Dunn, A., Baguley, T., & Stacey, P. C. (2016). Matching novel face and voice identity using static and dynamic facial images. Attention, Perception and Psychophysics. DOI: 10.3758/s13414-015-1045-8

    Stacey, P. C., Kitterick, P. T., Morris, S. D., & Sumner, C. J. (2016). The contribution of visual information to the perception of speech in noise with and without informative temporal fine structure. Hearing Research, 336, 17-28.

    Guest, D., Howard, C. J., Brown, L. A., & Gleeson, H. (2015). Aging and the rate of visual information processing. Journal of Vision, 15(14):10, 1–25, doi:10.1167/15.14.10.

    Lee, Y. M., Sheppard, E., and Crundall, D. (2015). Cross-cultural effects on the perception and appraisal of approaching motorcycles at junctions. Transportation Research Part F, 31, 77-86.

    Mackenzie, A.K. & Harris, J.M. (2015). Eye movements and hazard perception in active and passive driving, Visual Cognition, 23(6), 736-757.

    Sharples, S., Shalloe, S., Burnett, G., and Crundall, D. (2016). Journey decision making: the influence on drivers of dynamic information presented on variable message signs. Cognition, Technology and Work, 18, 2, 303-317.

    Crundall, D., Stedmon, A. W., Crundall, E., and Saikaysit, R. (2014). The role of experience and advanced training on performance in a motorcycle simulator. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 73, 81-90.

    Young, A. H., Chapman, P., & Crundall, D. (2014). Producing a Commentary Slows Concurrent Hazard Perception Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 20, 3, 285-294.

    Stacey, P. C., Murphy, T., Sumner, C. J., Kitterick, P. T., & Roberts, K. L. (2014). Searching for a talking face: The effect of degrading the auditory signal. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 40(6), 2106.

  • Social cognition and perception

    Overview

    Across the cognition and perception group there are a range of projects that explore the interplay between cognition, perception and the social world. Examples include the role of collaboration  in areas such as recall, conformity in (meta)memory, decision making (e.g., jurors) and shared passenger / driver attention in driving.

    Other work examines the role of social context on face perception and deception detection, consumer behaviour and how the development of non-social skills supports and relates to the development of social skills (with a particular focus on autism).

    Related staff

    Sally Andrews, Matthew Belmonte, Andrew Dunn, Vivienne Du, Georgina Gous, Duncan Guest, Lai-Sang (Linda) Iao, Lucy Justice, Mark Sergeant, Harriet Smith Katarzyna Zawadzka.

    Publications

    Guest D., Estes Z., Gibbert M., & Mazursky D (2016) Brand Suicide? Memory and Liking of Negative Brand Names. PLoS ONE, 11(3): e0151628. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0151628

    Smith, H. M. J., Dunn, A., Baguley, T. & Stacey, P. C. (2016). Concordant cues in faces and voices: Testing the back-up signal hypothesis. Evolutionary Psychology. DOI: 10.1177/1474704916630317

    Zawadzka, K., Krogulska, A., Button, R., Higham, P. A., & Hanczakowski, M. (2016). Memory, metamemory, and social cues: Between conformity and resistance. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 145, 181-199.

    Holmqvist, J., Guest, D., & Gronroos, C, (2015) The role of psychological distance in value creation. Management Decision. 53(7), 1430-1451

    Conway, M. A., Justice, L. V. & Morrison, C. M. (2014). Beliefs about autobiographical memory and why they matter. The Psychologist. 27, 7, p. 502-505

  • Mathematical and statistical modelling

    Overview

    Mathematical and statistical models are used across our cognitive and perception research in order to better understand cognition. Examples include modelling memory, psycholinguistics and perceptual decision making. Alongside this there is a focus of research on best practice in psychological statistics, multilevel modelling and Bayesian data analysis.

    This work is supported by the Computational Modelling and Data Analysis Lab.

    Related staff

    Mark Andrews, Thom Baguley, Duncan Guest, Christina Howard, Gary Jones.

    Publications

    Baguley, T.S., & Andrews, M. (2016). Handling missing data. In Robertson, J. & Kaptein , M. (Eds.) Modern statistical methods for HCI. (pp. 57-85). Springer.

    Binder, J. F., Baguley, T., Crook, C., & Miller, F. (2015). The academic value of internships: Benefits across disciplines and student backgrounds. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 41, 73-82. doi:10.1016/j.cedpsych.2014.12.001

    Kent C., Guest, D., Adelman, J, A., and Lamberts, K (2014) Stochastic accumulation of feature information in perception and memory.  Frontiers in Cognitive Science, 5, 412.

    Lopez-Fernandeza, O., Honrubia-Serranoa, L., Baguley, T., & Griffiths, M. D., (2014). Pathological video game playing in Spanish and British adolescents: Towards the exploration of Internet Gaming Disorder symptomatology. Computers in Human Behavior, 41, 304–312. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2014.10.011

    Dunn, T., Baguley, T. & Brunsden, V. (2014). From alpha to omega: A practical solution to the pervasive problem of internal consistency estimation. British Journal of Psychology. 105, 399-412.

Each Key Research Area hosts a large number of distinct research projects, with real-world impacts described by four cross-cutting: cutting Strategic Research Themes:

  • Interactive Technologies

    Overview

    Our work on interactive technologies explores how we interact with technology and how technology can be used to support cognition and cognitive development. Examples include looking at computer-assisted training to promote language development in non-verbal children with autism (Belmonte), managing affective-learning through intelligent atoms and smart interactions (Belmonte – funded by European Commission Horizon 2020), exploring the neural correlates of tracking changing position of objects (Howard & Belmonte – funded by Fundaçã​​o Bial) and investigating the role of narrative and game play in category learning (Banyard, Guest & Howard – Defence Science and Technologies Laboratory).

    Related staff

    Matthew Belmonte, David Crundall, Duncan Guest, Christina Howard

  • Healthy Ageing

    Overview

    Our work on interactive technologies explores how we interact with technology and how technology can be used to support cognition and cognitive development. Examples include looking at computer-assisted training to promote language development in non-verbal children with autism (Belmonte), managing affective-learning through intelligent atoms and smart interactions (Belmonte – funded by European Commission Horizon 2020), exploring the neural correlates of tracking changing position of objects (Howard & Belmonte – funded by Fundaçã​​o Bial) and investigating the role of narrative and game play in category learning (Banyard, Guest & Howard – Defence Science and Technologies Laboratory).

    Related staff

    Matthew Belmonte, David Crundall, Duncan Guest, Christina Howard

  • Safety and security

    Overview

    Our research is related to safety and security in a variety of ways. We conduct research on face / voice identification that is relevant to police line-ups, CCTV monitoring, autobiographical memory (court testimony), transport safety and applied visual search (e.g., in lifeguarding).

    Related staff

    Sally Andrews, David Crundall, Andrew Dunn, Georgina Gous, Duncan Guest, Christina Howard, Lucy Justice, Victoria Laxton, Mark Sergeant, Harriet Smith, Petya Ventsislavova

    Publications

    Andrews, S., Burton, A. M., Schweinberger, S. R., & Wiese, H. (2016). Event-related potentials reveal the development of stable face representations from natural variability. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, (just accepted), 1-35.

    Andrews, S., Jenkins, R., Cursiter, H., & Burton, A. M. (2015). Telling faces together: Learning new faces through exposure to multiple instances. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 68(10), 2041-2050.

    Crundall, D., and Eyre-Jackson, L. (2015). Predicting criminal incidents on the basis of non-verbal behaviour: the role of experience. Security Journal, 86,  47-58.

    Flowe, H. D., Smith, H. M. J., Kar, N., Onwuegbusi, T. & Rai, L. (2015). Component and configural processing in simultaneous and sequential lineup procedures. Memory. DOI:10.1080/09658211.2015.1004350

    Smith, H. M. J. & Flowe, H. D. (2014). ROC analysis of the verbal overshadowing effect: Testing the effect of verbalisation on memory sensitivity. Applied Cognitive Psychology. DOI:10.1002/acp.3096

    Smith, H.M.J. & Baguley, T. (2014). Unfamiliar voice identification: Effect of post-event information on accuracy and voice ratings. Journal of European Psychology Students. DOI:10.5334/jeps.bs

    Howard, C.J., Troscianko, T., Gilchrist, I.D., Behera, A. & Hogg, D.C. (2013). Suspiciousness perception in dynamic scenes: a comparison of CCTV operators and novices, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 7. ISSN 1662-5161

  • Transport

    Overview

    Our research in the cognition and perception group encompasses a large amount of research on transport. Example of current projects include; cross-cultural hazard perception in driving (Crundall, Ventsislavova), hazard  perception in fire appliance drivers (Crundall, Mackenzie – funded by the Fire Service Research and Training Trust), shared attention by passengers / drivers and hazard perception (Young, Davies) and hazard perception in mobility scooter users (Guest, Young & Mackenzie). Work in this area is supported by extensive eye tracking equipment and several driving simulators.

    Related staff

    David Crundall, Robert Davies, Duncan Guest, Andrew Mackenzie, Mark Sergeant, Petya Ventsislavova, Angela Young

    Publications

    Mackenzie, A.K. & Harris, J.M. (In press). A link between attentional function, effective eye movements and driving ability. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

    Ventsislavova, P., Gugliotta, A., Peña-Suarez, E., García-Fernandez, P., Eisman, E., Crundall, D., and Castro, C. (in press). What happens when drivers face hazards on the road? An analysis of the cognitive processes involved in Hazard Perception and Prediction. Accident Analysis and Prevention.

    Gugliotta, A., Peña-Suárez, E., Ventsislavova, P., Garcia-Fernandez, P., Eisman, E., Crundall, D., & Castro, C. (in press). Are Situation Awareness and Decision-Making in driving totally conscious processes? Results of a Hazard Prediction task. Transportation Research Part F.

    Ba, Y., Zhang, W., Peng, Q., Salvendy, G., and Crundall, D. (2016). Risk-Taking on the Road and in the Mind: Behavioural and Neural Patterns of Decision Making between Risky and Safe Drivers. Ergonomics, 59, 1, 27-38.

    Crundall, D. (2016). Hazard prediction discriminates between novice and experienced drivers. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 86, 47-58.

    Castro, C., Ventsislavova, P., Sanchez, J., Peña-Suarez, E., Gugliotta, A., García-Fernandez, P., Eisman, E., and Crundall, D. (2016). Proactive Listening to a Training Commentary improves Hazard Prediction. Safety Science, 82, 144-154.

    Sharples, S., Shalloe, S., Burnett, G., and Crundall, D. (2016). Journey decision making: the influence on drivers of dynamic information presented on variable message signs. Cognition, Technology and Work, 18, 2, 303-317.

    Lee, Y. M., Sheppard, E., and Crundall, D. (2015). Cross-cultural effects on the perception and appraisal of approaching motorcycles at junctions. Transportation Research Part F, 31, 77-86.

    Mackenzie, A.K. & Harris, J.M. (2015). Eye movements and hazard perception in active and passive driving, Visual Cognition, 23(6), 736-757.

    Alberti, C., Shahar, A., and Crundall, D. (2014). Are experienced drivers more likely than novice drivers to benefit from driving simulations with a wide field of view? Transportation Research Part F, 27, 124-132.

    Bener, A., Razzak, J. A., Crundall D., and Allen, K. (2014). The relationship between four-wheel drivers and risky driving behaviours. International Journal of Medicine and Public Health, 4, 3, 280-286.

    Castro, C., Padilla, J. L., Roca, J., Benítez, I, García-Fernández, P., Estévez, B., López-Ramón, M.F., and Crundall, D.(2014). Development and validation of the Spanish Hazard Perception Test. Traffic Inj. Prev., 15, 817-826.

    Crundall, D., Stedmon, A. W., Crundall, E., and Saikaysit, R. (2014). The role of experience and advanced training on performance in a motorcycle simulator. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 73, 81-90.

    Lim, P. C., Sheppard, E., and Crundall, D. (2014). A predictive hazard perception paradigm differentiates driving experience cross-culturally. Transportation Research Part F, 26, 210-217.

    Shalloe, S., Sharples, S. C., Burnett, G., Crundall, D. Meekums, R., Morris, D. (2014). Developing a Graphical Route Information Panel (GRIP) for use on the UK motorway network. The first steps. Transportation Research Part F, 27, 133-149.

    Young, A. H., Chapman, P., & Crundall, D. (2014). Producing a Commentary Slows Concurrent Hazard Perception Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 20, 3, 285-294.

Related staff

Core academic staff

Research staff

PhD students

  • Joshua Baker
  • Catherine Blackburn
  • Robert Davies
  • Georgina Gous
  • Victoria Laxton
  • Gabriella Mutale
  • Mark Crook-Rumsey
  • Jens Roeser
  • Jemaine Stacey
  • Russell Turk
  • Michael Vernon
  • Petya Ventsislavova

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