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BSc (Hons)

Equine Behaviour Health and Welfare

Equine Science student with horses
  • UCAS code(s): DC38 / DC39
  • Level(s) of study: Undergraduate
  • Study mode(s): Full-time / Sandwich
  • Location: Brackenhurst Campus
  • Starting: September 2020
  • Course duration: 3 / 4 year(s)
  • Entry requirements: More information
  • * This course is now closed for entry for 2020, please ring our Clearing Hotline 0115 848 6000 to speak to one of our team to discuss current vacancies. *

The BSc (Hons) Equine Behaviour, Health and Welfare course will provide you with a unique opportunity to study robust scientific evidence that will establish your understanding of the intrinsic nature and value of the horse. This course aims to provide good science graduates via a love of horses, gaining knowledge in fundamental applied use of behaviour, physiology and laboratory skills needed to optimise the welfare of horses in our care, allowing them to thrive and perform as required in industry.

Equine Behaviour, Health and Welfare student Tamara is available on Unibuddy to answer any questions you may have about this course.

Why choose this course?

  • You'll be based at our Brackenhurst Campus where you'll benefit from our extensive Equestrian Centre. Throughout the course you'll use the centre to gain the practical and research skills needed for careers in the equine industry.
  • You'll benefit from regular lectures and demonstrations from equine industry guest speakers and professionals.
  • We offer sport scholarships to elite athletes across a range of sports, including high-level riders.
  • Your course complements study towards the internationally recognised British Horse Society (BHS) examinations and United Kingdom Coaching Certificate (UKCC).
  • You'll get the opportunity to take part in field trips to a range of equestrian and research establishments.
  • You can spend six months on international exchange with a partner university in Australia or Canada during your second year of study. The equine team have close links with the University of Guelph, Canada.
  • We also have an optional international equine management module which runs as a ten day field course in Switzerland based at the Swiss National Stud. The field course covers the anatomical and physiological basis of equine reproduction and evaluates the variation of worldwide management practices, due to sport and local environmental factors both in a general and breeding related context.
Video Icon
A day in the life of Lizzie Baugh, Equine Science student
Lizzie Baugh tells us about her life as an Equine Science student and sports scholar.

What you'll study

Your learning will be based upon equine behaviour, health and welfare, including the anatomy and physiology of the horse, and equitation science. You'll develop your knowledge in specialist areas including:

  • equine learning and cognition
  • behavioural analysis
  • disease and diagnostics
  • optimising equine welfare
  • therapeutic use of horses
  • Year One

    Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology

    Study the fundamental biological systems of mammals, and how these work together to maintain homeostasis.

    Equine Behaviour and Welfare

    Explore the roles that evolution and domestication have played in the development of innate and learnt equine behaviour. Assess the consequences of a variety of current approaches to horse management on behaviour and welfare.

    Academic, Research and Professional Skills

    Develop the practical, technical and communication skills required for the application of science to the equestrian industry.

    Science of Equitation

    Investigate and apply the science behind the riding and training of horses, whilst developing the horsemanship skills required by industry.

    Equine Management and Health

    Study the veterinary science of horse health, and practically apply these principles to the management of the horse.

    Equine Nutrition

    Learn how to apply the fundamental science of nutrition to equine feeding practices. Consider how discipline and sustainability of food sources influence nutritional management around the world.

  • Year Two

    Applied Exercise Physiology

    Investigate the physiological responses to exercise and training in the equine and human athlete, developing your understanding of the demands of equestrian sports

    Research Methods for Animal Sciences

    Explore research principles as applicable to animal science, and use these to plan and execute a small group research project.

    Equine Learning and Cognition

    Discuss the various approaches to horse management and training and the biological basis of learning. You’ll also look at the neural adaptations that occur in relation to different types of learning and memory.

    Assessing and Optimising Welfare

    This module will give you an understanding of equine welfare issues, including behavioural, health and physiological factors. You’ll also evaluate current national and international research addressing optimisation of equine welfare, and look at product design and development.

    Reproduction, Breeding and Genetics

    Study the physiological basis of equine reproduction, and evaluate the veterinary and stud management practices and technologies used to support the selection and breeding of performance horses.

    Human Animal Interaction

    Discuss ideas and findings in human, equine and sports psychology and use these to design appropriate therapeutic uses of the horse. The module will also introduce you to the use of animals in a wide range of human therapies and how they can aid different areas of personal development.

  • Year Three

      This is a placement year for students on the four year course.
  • Final year

    Dissertation

    Carry out an original investigation into a topic area of your choice – plan, execute and analyse your project, demonstrating critical independent thought and key project management skills.

    Emerging Issues and Ethics

    Investigate and examine emerging welfare and performance issues related to the equestrian industry worldwide, and critically consider these using established ethical philosophies.

    Equine Disease and Diagnostics

    Understand equine diseases in regional and global context, and develop practical ability in laboratory and non-laboratory procedures used in industry and veterinary science

    The Sustainable Equine

    Recognise and explain developments in research that influence emerging advances for sustainability in equids. You’ll also critically evaluate current international issues relating to sustainability in the equine industry.

    Advances in Equitation Science

    Study the practical aspects of applying equitation science in the equine industry. You’ll look at key areas of interest and determine and develop key areas for change.

Course specification

View the full course specification
Please note that course specifications may be subject to change

How you’re taught

You’ll learn through a combination of lectures, seminars, group discussion and practical work. Throughout the course, you’ll also hear from external industry professionals through guest lectures and visits to a range of equestrian and research establishments.

Covid-19 Planning

We will be adopting a range of blended teaching and learning techniques including online and face-to-face (where practical) to ensure that students can meet their learning outcomes in full. We will respond proactively to any national or local policy changes (including lock down) to ensure student safety as our primary concern whilst continuing to focus on offering a comprehensive student academic experience and will work flexibly with our students to ensure they are not disadvantaged by Covid 19.

Assessment methods

Year 1 coursework (59%), written (33%) and practical (8%).

Year 2 coursework (67%), written (33%) and practical (0%).

Year 3 coursework (83%), written (17%) and practical (0%).

Contact hours

A full-time student on average can expect to spend 1200 hours a year learning which will typically be broken down as follows:

  • Year 1 lectures/seminars/workshops (26%), independent study (74%) and placements (0%).
  • Year 2 lectures/seminars/workshops (26%), independent study (74%) and placements (0%).
  • Year 3 lectures/seminars/workshops (20%), independent study (80%) and placements (0%).

A placement year may be taken between year 2 and year 3 of study.

96% students would agree the staff are good at explaining things (School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences, NSS 2020)

Careers and employability

Your career development

Upon graduation you'll be equipped to enter a variety of careers. Our graduates have entered fields as diverse as nutrition, veterinary-related roles, equine behaviour retraining, equine assisted therapy and equine charities.

Our students have gone on to work for companies such as:

  • the Irish equine Aqua Centre
  • the British Equestrian Trade Association (BETA)
  • Newmarket Equine Hospital

Some students have continued on to postgraduate study in equine and animal subjects, or embarked on second degrees in physiotherapy-related degrees.

Excellent placement opportunities

You'll be encouraged and supported to gain relevant industry experience at appropriate organisations throughout the course. Our students have previously been based at places such as behaviour clinics, rehabilitation and retraining centres in the thoroughbred industry in countries such as Australia, New Zealand, the USA and the UK.

Students have carried out placements at companies such as:

  • Australian Equine Behaviour Centre (Andrew McLean)
  • Bellerive Stud, Australia
  • Bennett Equine Sport Rehabilitation
  • Fittocks Stud Newmarket
  • Hartstone Equestrian Ltd
  • Pakiri Beach Horse Riding, New Zealand

Why undertake a placement?

  • You will gain vital experience in a vocational position.
  • It will boost your CV and build useful contacts for your future career.
  • There are some exciting and challenging opportunities available within organisations such as Kentucky Equine Research, and Sydney, Edinburgh and Liverpool Universities.
  • You will also have the opportunity to carry out research for your final year dissertation.
  • Your placement opportunity may lead to a supplementary Certificate or Diploma in Professional Studies.

Our Brackenhurst Campus Equestrian Centre is home to a British Horse Society (BHS) approved training and livery establishment.

Entry requirements

What are we looking for?

  • A-levels – BBC, including a Science subject; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – DMM, including relevant Science modules; or
  • City & Guilds Level 3 Extended Diploma - DMM, including relevant Science modules
  • 112 UCAS Tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent qualifications, including an A-level equivalent in a Science subject; and
  • GCSEs – English and Maths grade C / 4.

For this course we accept the following Science subjects: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Human Biology and Psychology.

Applicants without A-levels will have their applications assessed for subject compatibility.

We also consider equivalent qualifications and combinations.

If you are unsure whether the qualifications you have, or are currently studying for, meet the minimum entry requirements for this course, please contact us before submitting an application through UCAS.

The UCAS Tariff

We've created a UCAS Tariff calculator to help you work out how many UCAS points your qualifications relate to.

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions Team or call on +44 (0)115 848 4200.

NTU may admit a student with advanced standing beyond the beginning of a course, through an assessment of that student's prior learning, whether it is certificated or uncertificated. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available to these prospective students, such as recognising experiential learning or transferring to a similar course at another institution, otherwise known as credit transfer.

All prospective students who wish to apply via Recognition of Prior Learning should initially contact the central Admissions and Enquiries Team who will be able to support you through the process.

We accept qualifications from schools, colleges and universities all over the world for entry onto our courses. If you’re not sure how your international qualification matches our course requirements please visit our international qualifications page.

Foundation courses

If you need to do a foundation course to meet our course requirements please visit Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC). If you’re already studying in the UK at a school or college and would like to know if we can accept your qualification please visit our foundation courses page.

English language entry requirements

If English is not your first language you need to show us that your language skills are strong enough for intensive academic study. We usually ask for an IELTS test and we accept some alternative English language tests.

Help and support

If you have any questions about your qualifications or about making an application to the University please email our International Team for advice.

NTU may admit a student with advanced standing beyond the beginning of a course, through an assessment of that student's prior learning, whether it is certificated or uncertificated. Our Recognition of Prior Learning and Credit Transfer Policy outlines the process and options available to these prospective students, such as recognising experiential learning or transferring to a similar course at another institution, otherwise known as credit transfer.

All prospective students who wish to apply via Recognition of Prior Learning should initially contact the central Admissions and Enquiries Team who will be able to support you through the process.

How to apply

Ready to join us? Then apply as soon as you can. Just click the Apply button at the top of the page and follow the instructions for applying. Make sure you check the entry requirements above carefully before you do.

Writing your application and personal statementBe honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember, we can only make a decision based on what you tell us. So include all of your qualifications and grades, including resits or predicted grades.

Your personal statement is a really important part of your application. It’s your chance to convince us why we should offer you a place! You’ve got 4,000 characters to impress us. Make sure you use them to show how your skills and qualities are relevant to the course(s) you’re applying for. For more hints and tips, take a look at our page on how to write a good personal statement.

Keeping up-to-date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU on our Your Application page. Good luck with your application!

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions Team or call on +44 (0)115 848 4200.

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

You can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year. If you are applying to more than one UK university you must apply through UCAS.

Apply as early as you can so that you have time to prepare for your studies. If you need a visa to study here you need to plan this into your application.

Apply now

Keeping up-to-date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Good luck with your application!

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions Team or call on +44 (0)115 848 4200.

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Fees and funding

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there’s no need to feel anxious and confused about it. We hope that our fees and funding pages will answer all your questions.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service.

Tel: +44 (0)115 848 2494

Additional costs

Your course fees cover the cost of studies, and include loads of great benefits, such as the use of our library, support from our expert Employability team, and free use of the IT equipment across our campuses.

Library books

Most study modules will recommend one or more core text books, which most students choose to purchase. Book costs vary and further information is available in the University’s bookshop. Our libraries provide a good supply of essential text books, journals and materials (many of which you can access online) – meaning you may not need to purchase as many books as you might think! There may also be a supply of second-hand books available for purchase from previous year students.

Field trips

You will be charged a maximum of £60 for any compulsory residential trips in the UK, and a maximum of £300 for compulsory overseas residential field courses, as a contribution towards travel, accommodation and entrance fees where applicable. Non-residential day excursions are included in the tuition fee and other non-compulsory opportunities, in the UK and abroad, may also be offered, and these will be charged at full cost to students. A valid passport and any associated visas will also be required for field trips outside of the UK.

Placements

If you're undertaking a placement year, you'll need to budget for accommodation and any travel costs you may incur whilst on placement. Many of our placement students do earn a salary whilst on placement which can help to cover these living costs.

Print and copy costs

The University allocates an annual printing and copying allowance of £20 depending on the course you are studying. For more details about costs for additional print and copying required over and above the annual allowance please see the Printing, photocopying and scanning information on the Library website.

Other costs

All students will be expected to provide their own riding equipment to include jodhpurs or breeches; hairnet; riding hat; gloves; long boots or jodhpur boots with matching half chaps; polo short and sweatshirt.

All students will also be expected to provide their own appropriate fieldwork clothing, including walking boots (with ankle support), wellingtons and waterproof trousers and coat.

International fees and scholarships

For information on international and EU fees and advice on how to pay, please visit our international fees page.

We offer prestigious scholarships to new international students holding offers to study at the University. For details and an application form please visit our international scholarships information.

Additional costs

Your course fees cover the cost of studies, and include loads of great benefits, such as the use of our library, support from our expert Employability team, and free use of the IT equipment across our campuses.

Library books

Most study modules will recommend one or more core text books, which most students choose to purchase. Book costs vary and further information is available in the University’s bookshop. Our libraries provide a good supply of essential text books, journals and materials (many of which you can access online) – meaning you may not need to purchase as many books as you might think! There may also be a supply of second-hand books available for purchase from previous year students.

Field trips

You will be charged a maximum of £60 for any compulsory residential trips in the UK, and a maximum of £300 for compulsory overseas residential field courses, as a contribution towards travel, accommodation and entrance fees where applicable. Non-residential day excursions are included in the tuition fee and other non-compulsory opportunities, in the UK and abroad, may also be offered, and these will be charged at full cost to students. A valid passport and any associated visas will also be required for field trips outside of the UK.

Placements

If you're undertaking a placement year, you'll need to budget for accommodation and any travel costs you may incur whilst on placement. Many of our placement students do earn a salary whilst on placement which can help to cover these living costs.

Print and copy costs

The University allocates an annual printing and copying allowance of £20 depending on the course you are studying. For more details about costs for additional print and copying required over and above the annual allowance please see the Printing, photocopying and scanning information on the Library website.

Other costs

All students will be expected to provide their own riding equipment to include jodhpurs or breeches; hairnet; riding hat; gloves; long boots or jodhpur boots with matching half chaps; polo short and sweatshirt.

All students will also be expected to provide their own appropriate fieldwork clothing, including walking boots (with ankle support), wellingtons and waterproof trousers and coat.

Still need help?

+44 (0)115 941 8418