International Summer School in Forensic Linguistic Analysis

Forensic Linguistics
  • Level(s) of study: Short course
  • Study mode(s): Full-time
  • Location: City Campus
  • Starting: 9 September 2019
  • Course duration: Five days (Monday to Friday 9 am - 5 pm)

Founded in 2000 by Professor Malcolm Coulthard, the International Summer School in Forensic Linguistic Analysis (ISSFLA) addresses topics to do with the role, shape and evidential value of language in legal and forensic contexts.

It was created in response to a growing demand for a course affording an overview of forensic linguistics while also laying solid foundations for a further study of this relatively new branch of applied linguistics.

The Summer School’s first edition took place at Anglia Polytechnic University and has been followed by editions in Birmingham and cities around the world (Barcelona, Kuala Lumpur, Lodz, Mainz,  Manila and Porto).

2019 sees the seventeenth edition, held at Nottingham Trent University.

The city campus is in the heart of Nottingham, with easy access via rail, road and air, and plenty of attractions to discover during the evenings.

Read a brief introduction to forensic linguistics.

Speakers

Apart from being professional linguists or lawyers, all of our tutors have first-hand experience of providing expert evidence for courts of law.

Malcolm Coulthard, ISSFLA Founder and Director of Studies

Emeritus Professor of Forensic Linguistics at Aston University, where he was the founding director of the Centre for Forensic Linguistics, Malcolm Coulthard is best known for his work on the analysis of Spoken and Written Discourse and his An Introduction to Discourse Analysis (1977/1985) is still widely used.

He is the founding editor of The International Journal of Speech, Language and the Law and was the Founding President of the International Association of Forensic Linguists.

He is the author of 20 authored and edited books, as well as 50 articles and chapters in books, and has supervised numerous PhD dissertations on various aspects of language and law.

Prof. Coulthard has been commissioned to write reports in over 150 cases including The Birmingham Six, The Derek Bentley Appeal (where, in 1998, the verdict of guilty was overturned after 46 years) and The Bridgewater Four Appeal, and has given expert evidence in courts in England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Germany and Hong Kong.

Dr David Wright, host for Nottingham Trent University (NTU) and Course Director

David Wright is a lecturer in Linguistics at NTU.

He is a research active member of the English, Media and Creative Cultures group, publishing in international journals and regularly presenting at international conferences.

David is a forensic linguist and his research explores the application of language analysis to help improve the delivery of justice.

His current research projects span across a range of intersections between language and the law, evidence, crime and justice.

David’ research applies methods of corpus linguistics and discourse analysis in forensic contexts.

His current research projects span across a range of areas in forensic linguistics, corpus linguistics and discourse analysis, including:

  • Forensic Authorship Analysis
  • Empirical explorations of idiolect
  • Street Harassment of Children
  • Incitement of Violence Against Women Online
  • The language of advocacy
  • The ‘voice’ in law and evidence.

Dr Krzysztof Kredens, Director of Studies

Dr Krzysztof Kredens is a Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at Aston University.

In 2008 he co-founded the university’s Centre for Forensic Linguistics, where he is now Co-Director.

He consults regularly on linguistic issues and provides investigative and evidential reports in law enforcement contexts.

He is an elected member of the Executive Committee of the International Association of Forensic Linguists and registered with the National Crime Agency’s Expert Advisers Database.

Dr Samuel Larner is a Senior Lecturer in Forensic Linguistics and Postgraduate Linguistics Network Leader at Manchester Metropolitan University.

He is also Programme Leader for the MSc in Communication, Behaviour and Credibility Analysis.

On this course, he teach a range of topics including forensic linguistics, interpersonal communication, and research skills.

Samuel’s research interests lie primarily in investigative forensic linguistics, with a specific focus on authorship analysis.

His research unites the psycho- and sociolinguistic theory of language.

Further research interest lies in deception detection, having previously worked as a Senior Research Associate in the Department of Psychology at Lancaster University.

Professor Tim Grant

Professor Grant has qualifications in both linguistics and psychology and is particularly interested in the interaction between forensic linguistics and forensic psychology.

He teaches undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Forensic Linguistics and Research Methods at Aston University.

His main research interests are in forensic authorship analysis and in the conversations which occur between attackers and victims in cases of serious sexual assault and rape.

He has publications in both of these areas in both psychology and linguistics journals.

His consultancy has largely involved the analysis of abusive and threatening communications in many different contexts including investigations into sexual assaults, murder and terrorist offences.

It has also included cases of copyright infringement and academic plagiarism.

Dr Nicci MacLeod

Nicci is a Lecturer in English Language and Linguistics at Northumbria University.

She was previously a Research Associate at the Centre for Forensic Linguistics at Aston University, where she completed her PhD in 2010 on the topic of police interviews with women reporting rape.

Since then she has been involved in a variety of research projects, from examining the language of 17th century quasi-legal texts all the way through to discursive patterns in Dark Web criminal communities.

She regularly provides expert evidence in investigative and evidential contexts

Any questions?

Contact the short course team in the School of Arts and Humanities:

Email: creativeshortcourses@ntu.ac.uk

Telephone: +44 (0)115 848 2813

What you'll study

The Summer School addresses subjects within the broadly defined discipline of forensic linguistics, including the nature of legal language, forensic authorship analysis, linguistic copyright issues, plagiarism and its detection, and legal translation and interpreting.

We work with authentic language data and use real cases to illustrate theory.

We opt for maximum participant involvement, and encourage critical inquiry and debate.

This gives you the unique opportunity to interact directly with those responsible for recent developments in the field of language and the law and forensic linguistics.

Generally speaking, it is concerned with the role, shape and evidential value of language in legal and forensic settings.

The structured programme will appear on our website soon.

Subjects have included:

  • analysis of legal discourse
  • structure and semantics of statutes and legal instruments
  • legal terminology
  • legal translation and interpreting
  • speech style in the courtroom
  • social organisation of conversation in legal settings
  • structure of cross-examination
  • socio-pragmatic aspects of interpreting in court
  • comprehensibility of legal instruments
  • language and disadvantage before the law
  • linguistic minorities and linguistic human rights
  • forensic text analysis
  • forensic speech science
  • trade name and domain name disputes.

USEFUL LINKS

Centre for Forensic Linguistics at Aston University

International Association of Forensic Linguists

International Association for Forensic Phonetics and Acoustics

International Association of Applied Linguistics

The International Journal of Speech, Language and the Law

International Journal for the Semiotics of Law

Entry requirements

There are none as such.

Anyone with an interest in forensic linguistics is welcome.

Among the participants in previous years were civil servants, police officers, translators, a crime fiction author as well as undergraduate and postgraduate students of linguistics and other disciplines.

They came from all corners of the world.

In order to fully benefit from the course, participants with no background in linguistics should familiarise themselves with an introductory text such as Aitchison's ‘Linguistics’, Fromkin, Rodman and Hyams' ‘An Introduction to Language’, or Parker and Riley's ‘Linguistics for Non-Linguists’.

The course does not offer credit.

However, we will be happy to provide documentation if you plan to get your institution to recognise the summer school as contributing to your degree programme.

There are none as such.

Anyone with an interest in forensic linguistics is welcome.

Among the participants in previous years were civil servants, police officers, translators, a crime fiction author as well as undergraduate and postgraduate students of linguistics and other disciplines.

They came from all corners of the world.

In order to fully benefit from the course, participants with no background in linguistics should familiarise themselves with an introductory text such as Aitchison's ‘Linguistics’, Fromkin, Rodman and Hyams' ‘An Introduction to Language’, or Parker and Riley's ‘Linguistics for Non-Linguists’.

The course does not offer credit.

However, we will be happy to provide documentation if you plan to get your institution to recognise the summer school as contributing to your degree programme.

How to apply

Please pay by debit/credit card via the NTU online store.

You can also pay by bank transfer or by invoice if your company is paying.

Email the short course office for further details:

creativeshortcourses@ntu.ac.uk

You can also email us if you can’t attend this time but would like to be kept informed of future dates.

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Please pay by debit/credit card via the NTU online store.

You can also pay by bank transfer or by invoice if your company is paying.

Email the short course office for further details:

creativeshortcourses@ntu.ac.uk

You can also email us if you can’t attend this time but would like to be kept informed of future dates.

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Fees and funding

The course costs £735 + VAT (£882).

The fee is the same for everyone who attends.

The fee includes refreshments and lunch each day, and an evening social dinner.

It is not possible to attend individual days.

This course takes place in the centre of Nottingham, which means there are plenty of good hotels to choose from.

We recommend the following on our campus doorstep:

Crown Plaza Hotel, Wollaton Street

Premier Inn, Goldsmith Street

Visit the NTU accommodation webpages for more options.

The course costs £735 + VAT (£882).

The fee is the same for everyone who attends.

The fee includes refreshments and lunch each day, and an evening social dinner.

It is not possible to attend individual days.

This course takes place in the centre of Nottingham, which means there are plenty of good hotels to choose from.

We recommend the following on our campus doorstep:

Crown Plaza Hotel, Wollaton Street

Premier Inn, Goldsmith Street

Visit the NTU accommodation webpages for more options.

Still need help?

+44 (0)115 941 8418