BA (Hons)

Spanish and Philosophy

students in front of Spanish sign
Top
20
In the UK for Philosophy
in The Guardian University Guide 2019
  • UCAS code(s): RV45
  • Level(s) of study: Undergraduate
  • Study mode(s): Sandwich
  • Location: Clifton Campus
  • Starting: September 2019
  • Course duration: 4 year(s)
  • Entry requirements: More information

FIND US ON

These two dynamic subjects will help you to develop your Spanish language skills, while also giving you an understanding of some of the philosophical ideology that has shaped world events and societies.

This degree enables you to shape your study according to your strengths, interests and career ambitions. Combining these two subjects can give your degree an international perspective that will make you stand out in the graduate employment market.

Our course combinations are designed so that what you learn in one subject will complement and enhance what you learn in the other. In your final year you can choose either to split your time evenly between your two subjects, or to specialise in one. Our flexible curriculum has been designed to create some amazing opportunities for you too. Your second year of study is divided into two semesters that enables you to take part in optional work placements or go on international exchange.

By choosing Spanish and Philosophy you’ll enjoy the freedom to choose from a wide range of optional modules, depending on your own preferences and interests. You'll develop a high level of verbal and written communication skills in Spanish, as well as an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the countries in which Spanish is spoken.You'll also develop your powers of argument, critical analysis and questioning ability.

  • 94% student satisfaction rate for Iberian Studies (Spanish) at NTU (NSS 2018).
  • NTU’s Spanish courses are ranked in the UK’s Top 10 for student satisfaction (NSS 2018).
  • Take part in a language-themed work placement.
  • Gain practical skills in translation and interpreting.
  • Take a year abroad in Spain or South America.
  • Study Spanish from beginners, GCSE or Post A-Level.
  • 93% of Philosophy joint honours graduates are in work or further study within just six months of finishing their degree (DLHE 2016 /17).
  • 91% student satisfaction rate for philosophy (NSS 2018).
  • NTU’s philosophy courses are in the UK’s Top 20 for student satisfaction (NSS 2018).
  • Philosophy joint honours courses are ranked 13th in the Guardian League Tables 2019.
  • Study this course full-time with a year abroad (sandwich) or part-time. See How to Apply section.

What you'll study

Spanish

Whether you’re coming to us as a complete beginner, or you’ve already studied Spanish to A-level, this exciting course will give you a high level of fluency and accuracy in spoken and written Spanish. Throughout the degree we’ll explore Spanish and Latin American culture and you’ll also gain an in-depth understanding of contemporary Spanish and Latin American society. To further increase your career options you can take a final year module that develops translation and interpreting skills.

To provide opportunities to develop language skills outside the classroom, you’ll have access to our excellent language resource centres which provide: internet access, audio-visual facilities, an extensive library of the latest Spanish-language films, computer-aided language learning software, and course-related books, materials and periodicals.

Philosophy

People have been studying philosophy for about 3,000 years and its original questions are still being discussed by today's leading minds. Philosophers believe that the ability to question and think critically about the world is an important skill, something that’s now increasingly recognised by many of today's leading employers.

The course at NTU is organised around some of the philosophical problems faced by today's decision-makers in their professional lives. You’ll examine the interface between philosophical ideas and everyday life, and learn to think more clearly and critically about the world you live in.

At the end of your studies, you should be able to think through complex issues and questions with clarity and rigour. No intellectual problem should daunt you! No wonder philosophy graduates are in demand by today's employers, and as a Philosophy graduate from NTU you’ll be ahead of the pack.

  • Year One

    Core modules

    Spanish Language One (Accelerated Beginners)

    This module will equip you with the ability to communicate effectively in a variety of real-life situations and to build language learning skills and other transferable competencies. You will experience rapid progress in the language, and you will gain a solid foundation speaking, writing, listening and reading.

    Introduction to Hispanic Studies (Accelerated Beginners)

    Address issues and themes relevant to an understanding of the contemporary Spanish-speaking world.

    Spanish Language One (Post A-level)

    Develop both your understanding of key issues in contemporary Spanish culture and society, and your key communicative skills in Spanish: listening, speaking, reading, writing.

    Introduction to Spanish Society and Culture (Post A-level)

    Study the key issues and events that have shaped Spanish culture and society since the beginning of the 20th Century.

    Applied Philosophy I

    This module will examine the fundamental questions that have defined Philosophy as a discipline. Particular emphasis will be given to debates surrounding the nature of rationality, logic and critical thinking; the rhetorical power of language and the issues surrounding the use of rhetoric as a tool of persuasion; the uses of scepticism and the question of whether there are limits to what we can know; the ethics of corporate governance; the ethics of animal rights and euthanasia as well as the philosophical significance of the environmental crisis and biotechnology.

    Philosophy: Thinkers and Themes

    This module aims to understand the development of western philosophy through its 2,800 year history. More specifically, it examines the claims of the philosophers whose ideas have helped to shape the moral, intellectual and political contours of the contemporary world.

  • Year Two

    Core modules

    Spanish Language Two (Accelerated Beginners)

    Develops your  fluency and accuracy in the spoken and written language. Grammar will be consolidated and expanded, and essay-writing skills developed.

    Spanish Language Two (Post A-level)

    Enhance fluency and accuracy in the spoken and written language. Develop the four language learning skills, grammar, and other transferable skills, through such tasks as video analysis, summaries and translations, and oral debates and presentations.

    Spanish Language Three (Accelerated Beginners)

    You will further develop your fluency in Spanish. You'll begin to develop analytical and critical skills and apply these to Spanish written and aural sources.

    Introduction to Contemporary Philosophy

    This module will introduce you to the ideas of the key thinkers that have helped to shape the development of 20th-century philosophy. Specific ideas and themes covered will include the significance of Kant in the development of contemporary European thought; Husserl and phenomenology; Heidegger on the authentic life as well as work on the nature of language, meaning and the mind by contemporary British and American analytic philosophers.

    Spanish optional modules

    Introduction to Spanish Cultural Representation (Post A-level)

    Study cultural representations of national identity, gender, class and race by looking at the work of Spanish and Latin American painters, musicians, writers and film directors.

    Introduction to Latin American studies (Post A-level)

    Address issues and themes relevant to an understanding of contemporary Latin America.

    Introduction to Contemporary Spain (Accelerated Beginners)

    Study issues and themes relevant to an understanding of contemporary Spain.

    Languages at Work

    Languages at Work is a language-themed work placement module, involving a series of preparatory lectures / seminars, a placement with a local employer of at least 30 hours, and the production of a piece of writing reflecting on the experience.

    Philosophy optional modules

    Applied Philosophy II

    Philosophy is often viewed as a remote and highly esoteric discipline that has very little to say to ‘ordinary people’ in their workaday lives.

    This module will challenge this view, and examine the ways in which philosophical forms of questioning and analysis can assist us both in our personal and in our working lives. Drawing upon both ancient and modern philosophical sources, the module will examine the way in which philosophy can provide us with ideas and arguments that point us towards greater self-insight and ultimately better ways of living.

    Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion

    This module introduces you to the key debates and themes in contemporary philosophy of religion. The module aims to facilitate an awareness of religion’s problematic status in modern philosophy through allowing you to explore the assumptions of key thinkers in an area of philosophical inquiry that also touches on important theological issues.

    Philosophy and Media

    This interdisciplinary module aims to view the media philosophically through the lens of everyday life. Its central organising theme is the media’s potential to operate as a powerful philosophical tool within an image saturated society, with the capability to transmit, influence and critique dominant ideological norms.

    The Philosophy of Time

    Study two opposed contemporary theories of time's flow and three opposed ontological positions regarding the existence of the past, present and future.

  • Year Three

    In Year Three you can spend time working or studying in Spain or Latin America. Our partner Universities are found in Alcala, Avila, Leon, Madrid, Salamanca, Santander, Valencia, and Santiago in Chile.

  • Final Year

    Core modules

    Capstone Project

    A specialist research project, which develops in-depth skills in planning, self-reliance and organisation.

    OR

    Dissertation

    The final year dissertation module enables you to undertake a sustained, single piece of independently researched work on a topic of your choice, under expert supervision.

    OR

    Real-Life Work Project

    If you unable to take the year abroad you will produce a Real-Life Work Project during your final year. This extended piece of research and writing equates to the capstone module (see above), but involves working closely with an organisation.

    Spanish Language Final

    The core language module, developing skills  in speaking, writing, listening and reading.

    Spanish optional modules

    Culture and Society in 20th-century Spain: Cinema, Music, Text

    Explore the representation of gender and the nation in different Spanish cultural texts from throughout the 20th Century.

    Contemporary Latin American Society

    Examine the economic, social and political change in Latin America focusing on the impact of restructuring in the region since the mid-1970s.

    Translation in the Professional World

    Develop your ability to translate out of Spanish into English and learn what it is like to be a professional translator in a major international organisation.

    Philosophy optional modules

    Wittgenstein and Heidegger

    This module introduces you to some of the central problems in contemporary philosophy through an examination of the work of two of the most important philosophers of the 20th Century: Martin Heidegger and Ludwig Wittgenstein.

    Reasons for Action

    The aim of the module is to introduce students to selected issues around the general topic: what kind of reasons for acting one way rather than another are good reasons? One possible reason for doing something is the belief that it’s the right thing to do: we ask whether morality can give us a reason for action. But we also consider other reasons for action (e.g. just wanting to do something) and what it is that we should be aiming for in life in general.

    Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind

    The overall aim of this module is to introduce you to the key concepts involved in contemporary philosophical debates about the nature and significance of the mind. The module examines critically the Cartesian idea that the mind is distinct substance separate from the body. It also explores the way that psychoanalysis and behaviourism both posed important challenges to this conception in the 20th Century.

    Advanced Topics in Applied Philosophy: Emotion and Power

    The overall aim of this module is to show how philosophical modes of inquiry can allow you to make sense of the personal experiences, professional practices and contemporary ways of being that have become central to many aspects of human life in western societies today.

    Philosophy of Religion II: World Philosophy

    Globalisation has radically transformed the world’s cultural landscape. In this module, you will examine the impact of globalisation on contemporary philosophical debates and the way in which it seems to call into question the Greek origins of philosophical ways of understanding the world.

    Philosophy and Film

    This module aims to view film-philosophy via two interconnected perspectives. You'll learn about the specificity of the film medium and its relationship with philosophy.

Course specification

View the full course specification
Please note that course specifications may be subject to change

How you’re taught

How will I learn?

Each year you’ll choose a range of core and optional modules from the lists above. The first year is normally divided equally between the two joint honours subjects but at the end of Year One, you’ll have the opportunity to select between an equally weighted joint honours course and a more specialised pathway, depending on your interests.

Teaching principally takes place through a combination of lectures, where tutors introduce the key ideas, and seminars, where smaller groups discuss those ideas.

Contact hours

If you’re struggling with a topic or require additional support or guidance, you can arrange to see your tutors in small groups or one-to-one, to discuss essay plans or to seek some specific academic guidance.

It is the nature of the subjects offered in the School of Arts and Humanities, however, that much of your time will be spent engaged in independent study. We recognise that this marks a change of culture from school or college, and we have in place a system of study support to help you adapt to this.

International exchange

You’ll also have the option to take part in an international exchange at a partner university. These options will enable you to gain impressive international experience, and broaden your perspective and career ambitions.

You’ll experience other cultures, travel the globe and open your eyes to a world of opportunities. Our exchange partnership with a number of international universities enables you to live and study in another country in your second year. Find out more.

Learn a new language

Alongside your study you also have the opportunity to learn another new language. The University Language Programme (ULP) is available to all students and gives you the option of learning a totally new language or improving the skills you already have.

Learning a new language can enhance your communication skills, enrich your experience when travelling abroad and boost your career prospects. Find out more about the University Language Programme.

Assessment methods

  • Year 1 coursework (50%), written (32%) and practical (18%)
  • Year 2 coursework (100%)
  • Final Year coursework (75%), written (20%) and practical (5%)

Contact hours

A full-time student on average can expect to spend 1200 hours a year learning which will typically be broken down as follows:

  • Year 1 lectures/seminars/workshops (27%), independent study (73%)
  • Year 2 lectures/seminars/workshops (26%), independent study (74%)
  • Year 3 placements (100%)
  • Year 4 lectures/seminars/workshops (27%), independent study (73%)

Careers and employability

Your career development

This is a major part of the curriculum. Key transferable skills are emphasised and there are opportunities to develop links with organisations and potential employers. As a result we have an outstanding record of graduate employment.

Joint honours courses develop a wide range of skills. These include written and oral communication skills, critical analysis and a variety of IT skills. But you’ll also become more self-motivated, be able to work independently and in teams, and develop excellent time management skills.

Entry requirements

  • 104 UCAS tariff points from up to four qualifications (two of which must be A-level equivalent); or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma - DMM.
  • GCSEs - English and Maths grade C / 4.

If you are unsure whether the qualifications you have, or are currently studying for, meet the minimum entry requirements for this course, please contact us before submitting an application through UCAS.

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions Team or call on +44 (0)115 848 4200.

We accept qualifications from schools, colleges and universities all over the world for entry onto our courses. If you’re not sure how your international qualification matches our course requirements please visit our international qualifications page.

Foundation courses

If you need to do a foundation course to meet our course requirements please visit Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC). If you’re already studying in the UK at a school or college and would like to know if we can accept your qualification please visit our foundation courses page.

Pre-masters and foundation courses

If you need to do a foundation or pre-Masters course to meet our course requirements please visit Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC). If you’re already studying in the UK at a school or college and would like to know if we can accept your qualification please visit our foundation and pre-Masters courses page.

English language entry requirements

If English is not your first language you need to show us that your language skills are strong enough for intensive academic study. We usually ask for an IELTS test and we accept some alternative English language tests.

Help and support

If you have any questions about your qualifications or about making an application to the University please contact our international team for advice.

University preparation courses

If you do not meet the entry requirements you may be interested in our pre-Masters / Foundation course at Nottingham Trent International College (NTIC) which leads onto this postgraduate / undergraduate degree if successfully completed. NTIC students are based on the City Campus and have access to all the University facilities.


Find out more about university preparation courses at NTIC.

How to apply

Ready to join us? Then apply as soon as you can.

For the Sandwich route (Full-time with year abroad) just click the Apply button at the top of the page and follow our step-by-step guide.

If you're applying for the part-time route please apply online using the NTU Applicant Portal.

Make sure you check the entry requirements above carefully before you do.

Writing your application and personal statement

Be honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember, we can only make a decision based on what you tell us. So include all of your qualifications and grades, including resits or predicted grades.

Your personal statement is a really important part of your application. It’s your chance to convince us why we should offer you a place! You've got 4,000 characters to impress us. Make sure you use them to show how your skills and qualities are relevant to the course(s) you’re applying for. For more hints and tips, take a look at our page on how to write a good personal statement.

Keeping up-to-date

After you've applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU on our Your Application page. Good luck with your application!

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions Team or call on +44 (0)115 848 4200.

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

You can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year. If you are applying to more than one UK university you must apply through UCAS.

Apply as early as you can so that you have time to prepare for your studies. If you need a visa to study here you need to plan this into your application.

Apply now

Keeping up-to-date

After you've applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process - so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Good luck with your application!

Getting in touch

If you need any more help or information, please email our Admissions Team or call on +44 (0)115 848 4200.

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Further information on how to apply

Need help with your application?
For admissions related enquiries please contact us:
Telephone: +44 (0)115 848 4200

Fees and funding

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there’s no need to feel anxious and confused about it. We hope that our fees and funding pages will answer all your questions.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service on +44 (0)115 848 2494.

While we aim to keep any extra study costs to a minimum, please see our page on additional costs and optional extras to find out about any additional expenses you may incur on your course.

International fees and scholarships

For international and EU fees for all courses together with advice on how to pay, please visit our international fees information.
We offer prestigious scholarships to our international students holding offers to study here. For details and an application form please visit our international scholarships information.

While we aim to keep any extra study costs to a minimum, please see our page on additional costs and optional extras to find out about any additional expenses you may incur on your course.

Still need help?

+44 (0)115 941 8418