BSc (Hons)

Physics and Mathematics (with Foundation Year)

Student using scientific equipment
  • UCAS code(s): FG35 / FG36 (with Placement)
  • Level(s) of study: Undergraduate
  • Study mode(s): Full-time / Sandwich
  • Location: Clifton Campus
  • Starting: September 2020
  • Course duration: Four years full-time or five years with placement

In the modern world, many new employment opportunities demand multi-skilled graduates. Those with mathematical and physics skills are among the most sought-after in fields including industrial research and development, computing, business, finance and teaching.

You’ll use our outstanding laboratory facilities. In the last year we’ve spent £250,000 on new equipment for our teaching laboratories including telescopes, CCD cameras, ultrasound scanners, magnetic resonance spectrometers, high speed cameras, thermal imaging equipment and a high resolution 3D printer.

Top ten in the UK for student satisfaction in Physics (NSS 2019)

What you'll study

How will I learn?

We will provide lectures, practical laboratory sessions, seminars and two to four surgery sessions each week. The rest of your time is given to self-guided independent study (reading text books, lecture notes and exercises)..

Meet the Team

Visit our academic team pages to find out more about our approach to teaching, our partners and research interests.

Learn a new language

Alongside your study you also have the opportunity to learn a new language. The University Language Programme (ULP) is available to all students and gives you the option of learning a totally new language or improving the skills you already have. As part of this, we’re offering scholarships for up to 30 students to study a language module as part of their degree.

Learning a new language can:

  • enhance your communication skills
  • enrich your experience when travelling abroad
  • boost your career prospects.

Find out more about the University Language Programme.

Placement Year

For those taking a placement year this will typically take place between the third and final year.

  • Year One

    Introductory Mathematics

    This module provides an introduction to important mathematical ideas, including Algebraic rearrangement, Trigonometry, Vectors, Descriptive Statistics, Integration and Differentiation. You’ll gain an understanding of ideas that form the basis of later, more specialised, developments and you’ll be able to solve simple but realistic mathematical problems.

    Intermediate Mathematics

    This module aims to provide the link between Introductory Mathematics and degree level Mathematics. You’ll cover more complex topics such as the chain rule and integration by parts, the generalisation of vectors to matrices, the approximation of numerical series, logic and probability, complex numbers and mathematical proof.

    Foundation Science

    In this module you’ll cover topics in Physics and Chemistry including exchange, transport and conservation of energy and inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. The aim of this module is to provide a sound scientific foundation for the study of engineering or mathematics at undergraduate degree level.

    Foundation Engineering

    This module includes basic electrical, electronic and mechanical engineering. Mechanics considers the consequences of applying forces to physical bodies; the electrical and electronics part of the module focuses on the scientific principles relevant to circuit theory, analogue electronics and components. Laboratory-based sessions will allow you to gain practical knowledge and experience.

    Practical and Professional Skills

    This module aims to provide a link between the theoretical modules on the course and their practical implementation. The professional skills aspect will help you with interpreting coursework requirements, exam and revision technique, note taking and referencing. The practical sessions will cover a variety of topics that require you to make use of the scientific principles and mathematical techniques that you’re learning in the other modules on the course.

  • Year Two

    • Mathematical Methods
    • Introduction to Numerical Methods
    • Vector Algebra and Calculus
    • Laboratory Instrumentation and Physics Skills
    • Ideas of Motion: Galileo to Einstein
    • Matter: Evidence for Quantisation
  • Year Three

    • Differential Equations and Transform Methods
    • Numerical Methods for Ordinary Differential Equations
    • Advanced Calculus
    • Thermal and Environmental
    • Fundamental Forces
    • The Quantum World
  • Final year

    Choose two modules from:

    • Differential and Integral Equations
    • Linear Systems
    • Numerical Analysis and Dynamical Systems
    • Topics in Applied Mathematics

    Core modules

    • Project in Mathematics (Mathematics students only)
    • Research Methodology and Ethics (Mathematics students only)
    • Project in Physics – includes research methods (Physics students only)

    Choose two modules from:

    • Condensed Matter
    • Advanced Modern Physics
    • Advanced Experimental Techniques

Course specification

View the full course specification
Please note that course specifications may be subject to change

How you’re taught

You will have around 20 hours per week of scheduled contact time with academic staff. This typically includes laboratory work, lectures and student centred activities. During the rest of your week you will be engaged in self-guided learning, and group or individual project work.

Careers and employability

Your career development

You will develop numerical, analytical and computational skills which are greatly respected by employers, in addition to essential, transferable skills which include report communication skills, team working and problem solving. Our physics graduates have gone on to work for companies such as:

  • aerothermal engineer – Rolls Royce
  • wind analyst – Prevailing Ltd
  • technical writer – KA Testing Facility
  • medical dosimetrist – NHS
  • software test engineer – Nikon
  • car configuration engineer – Jaguar Land Rover
  • teacher – numerous schools
  • public engagement of science officer – Science and Technology Facilities Council
  • graduate quantity surveyor – Balfour Beatty
  • scientist training programme – NHS

Many graduates also choose to undertake further study on one of our Masters-level courses or MPhil and PhD research degrees in areas including Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Quantum Computing and Detector Research.

Excellent placement opportunities

While studying for your degree, a placement is a valuable addition to your education. NTU is rated fourth in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016 for the number of students on year-long work placements. A placement may give you the chance to:

  • gain real life work experience
  • put knowledge and skills into practice
  • impress your employers – you could be offered a job at the end of your course.

Recently our students have taken placements at:

  • CERN
  • Netherlands Forensic Institute
  • Science and Technology Facilities Council
  • Merck Chemicals
  • Airbus
  • National Grid.

In addition we offer shorter (usually eight-week) paid placements in local secondary schools.

Entry requirements

What are we looking for?

  • 56 UCAS tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent including Physics grade C; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – MPP including Physics modules; and
  • GCSEs – Maths grade B/6 and English C/4.

Applicants without A-levels will have their qualifications assessed for subject compatibility. We also consider equivalent qualifications and combinations. Please see UCAS Course Search for more details.

What are we looking for?

  • 56 UCAS tariff points from three A-levels or equivalent; or
  • BTEC Extended Diploma – MPP; and
  • GCSEs – Maths grade B/6 and English C/4.

Applicants without A-levels will have their qualifications assessed for subject compatibility. We also consider equivalent qualifications and combinations. Please see UCAS Course Search for more details.

International qualifications

We accept qualifications from schools, colleges and universities all over the world for entry onto our UG and PG degrees. If you’re not sure how your international qualification matches our course requirements please visit our international qualifications page.

English language entry requirements

If English is not your first language you need to show us that your language skills are strong enough for intensive academic study. We usually ask for an IELTS test and we accept some alternative English language tests.

  • For a list of our language requirements please visit our English language page.
  • If you need to do a pre-sessional English language course to meet the English requirements please visit our pre-sessional English course page.

Help and support

If you have any questions about your qualifications or about making an application to the University please contact our International Team for advice.

How to apply

Writing your application and personal statement

Be honest, thorough and persuasive in your application. Remember, we can only make a decision based on what you tell us. So include all of your qualifications and grades, including resits or predicted grades.

Your personal statement is a really important part of your application. It’s your chance to convince us why we should offer you a place! You’ve got 4,000 characters to impress us. Make sure you use them to show how your skills and qualities are relevant to the course(s) you’re applying for. For more hints and tips, take a look at our page on how to write a good personal statement.

Keeping up-to-date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

You can get more information and advice about applying to NTU on our Your Application page. Good luck with your application!

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

You can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year. If you are applying to more than one UK university you must apply through UCAS.

Apply as early as you can so that you have time to prepare for your studies. If you need a visa to study here you need to plan this into your application.

  • For a step-by-step guide on making an application to the University please visit our how to apply page.
  • For advice on applying for a visa please visit our visa information page.
  • For advice on how to write a good personal statement please visit our personal statement page.

Keeping up-to-date

After you’ve applied, we’ll be sending you important emails throughout the application process so check your emails regularly, including your junk mail folder.

Good luck with your application!

Please read our notes on the University's commitment to delivering the educational services advertised.

Fees and funding

Preparing for the financial side of student life is important, but there’s no need to feel anxious and confused about it. We hope that our fees and funding pages will answer all your questions.

Getting in touch

For more advice and guidance, you can contact our Student Financial Support Service on telephone +44 (0)115 848 2494.

What do the course fees cover?

All mandatory costs for the course are covered in the course fee. In addition, most study modules will recommend one or more core textbooks, which most students choose to purchase. Book costs vary between courses and further information is available in the University’s bookshop. A good supply of these essential textbooks are available in the University libraries which students can easily borrow or access directly whilst studying in the library.

Students may choose to apply for a placement option during their course. If successful, students will be expected to pay for accommodation, travel and living costs whilst on placement.

Students will also be required to pay additional costs for printing, poster preparation and final dissertation copies in their final year - estimated costs approximately £20 - £50.

While we aim to keep any extra study costs to a minimum, please see our page on additional costs and optional extras to find out about any additional expenses you may incur on your course.

We offer prestigious scholarships to new international students holding offers to study at the University.

  • For more information other opportunities for funding please visit our international pages.
  • For information on how to pay your fees to the University please visit our international fee payment page.

What do the course fees cover?

All mandatory costs for the course are covered in the course fee. In addition, most study modules will recommend one or more core textbooks, which most students choose to purchase. Book costs vary between courses and further information is available in the University’s bookshop. A good supply of these essential textbooks are available in the University libraries which students can easily borrow or access directly whilst studying in the library.

Students may choose to apply for a placement option during their course. If successful, students will be expected to pay for accommodation, travel and living costs whilst on placement.

Students will also be required to pay additional costs for printing, poster preparation and final dissertation copies in their final year - estimated costs approximately £20 - £50.

While we aim to keep any extra study costs to a minimum, please see our page on additional costs and optional extras to find out about any additional expenses you may incur on your course.

Still need help?

Science and Technology course enquiries
+44 (0)115 848 8351